Resources

How the Women of Indonesia Rose up Against Land Grabbing

Land conflicts impact both indigenous men and women, but the burden often falls disproportionately on the latter. As food producers, knowledge holders, caretakers, healers, and keepers of culture, loss of access to valuable natural resources means a loss of self-reliance for the women, causing not only physical displacement but also economic and social difficulties.

BLOG: Learnings on gender from the Congo Basin

As a human rights organisation, gender justice is a fundamental principle of our work, and we have long been conscious of, and sought to address, the barriers to effective participation in decision-making by women. This blog summarises some of the experiences and learnings from our fieldwork in the Congo Basin over the past 5 years, on how to improve women’s effective participation at the community level.

Sengwer Women of Embobut forest call for help

More than 22 times now, our community has been forcefully evicted from our ancestral land in Embobut forest, Cherangany Hills, by the Kenya Forest Service (KFS), a government agency that is supposed to be responsible for the protection of forests in the country.

Our forest is empty: indigenous women monitor forest threats in Cameroon

On International Women’s Day 2017, indigenous Baka and Bagyeli women in the rainforest of southern Cameroon are facing up to threats to their lands, livelihoods and forests. Equipped with smartphone apps, women are learning how to monitor the issues that affect their lives the most.

Interview with Milka Chepkorir: Sengwer women in Kenya and their struggle for land rights

Milka Chepkorir Kuto is a human rights activist and member of the Sengwer indigenous people, who live in the the Embobut and Kabolet Forest, Kenya. For the last three years, Milka has been focusing on indigenous women and their role in defending land rights. In occasion of the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence, we have spoken to Milka about her work and the importance of including women in the struggle to retain ownership and control over their lands. 

Interview with Arnobia Moreno on women and indigenous land rights in Colombia

Arnobia Moreno lives in the indigenous Resguardo Cañamomo Lomaprieta, one of the oldest colonial reserves in Colombia. Over the years she has played a key role in involving women in the protection and conservation of their traditional land. As part of the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence, Arnobia told us about the importance of the Collective of Indigenous Women, which she helped creating, and her work to obtain the restitution of the original territory of the indigenous communities living in the Resguardo. 

Indigenous women in Central Africa “increasingly vulnerable” when it comes to access to land

A wide-ranging discussion on the rights of indigenous women in Africa was held last Sunday at the 59th Ordinary Session of the African Commission on Human Rights and Peoples Rights.  The panel, organised by the Commission’s Working Group on Indigenous Populations, looked at different aspects, including access to services, barriers to participation in decision-making and harmful traditional practices.

Indigenous woman representatives attend the CSW58 as a part of global indigenous leaders

Kapeeng Foundation

The fifty-eighth session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW58) took place at the United Nations Headquarters in New York from 10 to 21 March 2014. Each year, thousands of civil society activists, representatives of member states, UN entities, and ECOSOC-accredited non-governmental organizations (NGOs) from all regions of the world attended the session, this year with the priority theme being “Challenges and achievements in the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals for women and girls”.

Indigenous women of the Americas fighting against discrimination

Indigenous and human rights organisations from across the Americas are working together to develop a specific methodology for investigating, documenting and fighting indigenous women's cases through the justice system. The organisations involved include ONIC, the National Indigenous Organisation of Colombia; COAJ, the Board of Indigenous Organisations of Jujuy (Argentina); SER, Mixe People's Services (Mexico); QNW, Quebec Native Women (Canada); and AJDH, Lawyers for Justice and Human Rights (Mexico). This work is being carried out within the framework of a project called Ethnic and gender-based discrimination in the Americas: the case of indigenous women.

Indigenous women call on the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women to recognise indigenous peoples' collective rights

“To address the specific situations faced by indigenous women, the collective rights of indigenous peoples must be recognized as part of protecting the individual rights of indigenous persons. Interpretation and application of human rights treaties concerned with individual rights, including the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), should happen with reference to the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples”

Recommendation made to the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW Committee) by AIPP, NIWF and FPP

Lima Declaration of The World Conference of Indigenous Women, October 2013

We, Indigenous women from the seven sociocultural regions of the world, met at the World Conference of Indigenous Women, ‘Progress and Challenges Regarding the Future We Want’ in Lima, Peru, from October 28th to the 30th of 2013. Our gathering included elders and youth, urban and rural, knowledge holders and healers, activists and artists.