Resources

Nepali Communities Seek Justice for Violations in World Bank Project

Kathmandu, Nepal, July 14, 2015 – Last week an independent investigation revealed serious abuses in a World Bank-funded transmission line project in central Nepal. The Khimti-Dhalkebar transmission line runs through indigenous and rural communities, who have been raising concerns about the project for over five years. Though the findings validate community concerns, the World Bank has not committed to correcting the damage caused by its failures in this project.

Nepali Indigenous groups laud Supreme Court verdict on Constitutional Assembly nominations

Kamal Pariyar

KATHMANDU, May 13: Indigenous communities have lauded the Supreme Court´s (SC) recent order on filling the 26 vacant CA seats with representatives of indigenous communities that have not been represented in the CA. They have expressed hope that the implementation of the decision would make the new Constituent Assembly (CA) to be more inclusive. Of the total CA seats, 575 have already been filled, with only 23 of the total 59 scheduled indigenous communities represented at present.

FPP E-Newsletter December 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

What are the prospects for securing the land rights of indigenous peoples, local communities, and women in the foreseeable future?

Significantly, the report of the United Nations Secretary-General’s High Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda, under Goal 1 to “End Poverty”, sets a target to “Increase by x% the share of women and men, communities, and businesses with secure rights to land, property, and other assets”.

E-Boletín FPP Diciembre 2013 (PDF Version)

Queridos amigos:

¿Qué perspectivas hay de proteger los derechos territoriales de los pueblos indígenas, las comunidades locales y las mujeres en un futuro cercano?

Nepal: Identity and equality is all that indigenous women want

Source: MyRepublica

The contours of “New Nepal” we all dream of cannot be shaped without appropriately addressing the concerns being raised by the indigenous women, who comprise half the female population. Traditionally, these women enjoyed greater degree of freedom and socioeconomic status than those from the so-called high caste Hindu groups such as Bahun, Chhetri, and Thakuri, who were restricted by pervasive patriarchy and religious orthodoxy. Unlike these women of the Indo-Aryan origin, the indigenous women were adept in handicrafts and other enterprises and freely participated in socio-cultural events. They faced no restriction during menstruation and were even free to choose their life partner and to remarry if they became single. They were also less affected by the dowry system.

Recent reports and submissions

1. Destruction at Dawn: The Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the Republic of Nepal

An in-depth report into the development of the Arun III hydropower project and the challenges it, and projects like it, pose to the Nepali government commitments to protect the rights and interests of indigenous peoples (LAHURNIP, NGO-FONIN and FPP). 

Informes y presentaciones recientes

1. Destrucción al amanecer: Los derechos de los pueblos indígenas en la República de Nepal (Destruction at Dawn: The Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the Republic of Nepal)

Un informe detallado sobre el desarrollo del proyecto de energía hidroeléctrica Arun III y las amenazas que este proyecto y otros similares suponen para el compromiso del gobierno nepalí de proteger los derechos e intereses de los pueblos indígenas (LAHURNIP, NGO-FONIN y FPP). 

FPP E-Newsletter December 2012 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

The importance of ensuring respect for the rights of forest peoples’ to control their forests, lands and livelihoods, becomes ever clearer and yet more contested. As the articles in this edition of our newsletter starkly reveal, land and resource grabs are not just being imposed by commercial developers but are being actively promoted by governments, whose principle responsibility should be to protect the rights of citizens. Yet these same impositions are also being resisted, sometimes at great personal cost, by local communities and indigenous peoples.

Indigenous women raise their voices at CEDAW

In July, the 49th Session of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) met in New York. Indigenous women in Nepal, under the umbrella of the Nepal Indigenous Women’s Federation (NIWF), attended the session for the first time to defend and explain the findings that they had presented to the Committee in their Shadow Report. 

The report was supported also by the Lawyer’s Association for the Human Rights of Nepal’s Indigenous Peoples (LAHURNIP) and by the Forest Peoples Programme, and represented the first national level, self-researched and written, report on the status of indigenous women in the newly emerging Nepalese republic.

Las mujeres indígenas alzaron sus voces en la CEDAW

El 49. º período de sesiones del Comité para la Eliminación de la Discriminación contra la Mujer (CEDAW por sus siglas en inglés) se celebró en julio en Nueva York. Las mujeres indígenas de Nepal, representadas por la Federación de Mujeres Indígenas de Nepal (NIWF), asistieron por primera vez a estas reuniones para defender y explicar las conclusiones que habían presentado al Comité en su informe paralelo. 

Dicho informe también fue respaldado por la Asociación de Abogados para los Derechos Humanos de los Pueblos Indígenas de Nepal (LAHURNIP) y por el Forest Peoples Programme (Programa para los Pueblos de los Bosques), y fue el primer informe de ámbito nacional redactado por las propias mujeres y basado en una investigación realizada por ellas mismas sobre la situación de las mujeres indígenas en la recientemente creada república nepalesa.