Resources

FPP E-Newsletter December 2012 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

The importance of ensuring respect for the rights of forest peoples’ to control their forests, lands and livelihoods, becomes ever clearer and yet more contested. As the articles in this edition of our newsletter starkly reveal, land and resource grabs are not just being imposed by commercial developers but are being actively promoted by governments, whose principle responsibility should be to protect the rights of citizens. Yet these same impositions are also being resisted, sometimes at great personal cost, by local communities and indigenous peoples.

The return of fortress conservation: REDD and the green land grab in the Peruvian Amazon

I remember when the park guards first came to our village. They called a meeting and said ‘get your things together and pack your bags, don’t make any new farms and we will see where you can be resettled’.  

These are the words of Miguel Ishwiza Sangama, former headman of the village of Nuevo Lamas, a small Kichwa indigenous community in Northern Peru as he remembers the moment in 2007 when officials of the Cerro Escalera Regional Conservation Area first attempted to resettle his community. In the following years, Park authorities persisted with these efforts but when the community remained resistant the Park authorities resorted to restricting community access to the forest for hunting and gathering and prohibiting their traditional system of rotational agriculture. In 2010, charges were brought against three members of the community for practicing their rotational agriculture.

UNESCO will urge Peruvian government to reconsider Camisea gas expansion plans that threaten the rights of isolated indigenous peoples and the integrity of Manu National Park

Five Indigenous People’s organisations (AIDESEP, FENAMAD, ORAU, COMARU and ORPIO) have written a letter to the UN Special Rapporteurs for food, adequate shelter and on the rights of indigenous peoples requesting that they urge the Peruvian government to cancel its imminent plans to expand oil and gas development within the Territorial Reserve in favour of the Kugapakori, Nahua, Nanti and other ethnic groups in voluntary isolation or initial contact in South Ea

Shipibo communities in the Peruvian Amazon reject implementation of the Imiria Conservation Area for violation of their rights as indigenous peoples

Representatives of 12 Shipibo indigenous communities and neighbouring villages from the Imiria lake region in Ucayali, Peru have expressed their opposition to the Imiria Regional Conservation Area (RCA-Imiria), a protected area established by the Regional government of Ucayali. The RCA-Imiria was created in 2010 but the communities denounce the fact that it overlaps their traditional territory including the titled lands of seven communities.

National Indigenous Amazonian Peoples Organisation of Peru (AIDESEP) challenges the development of the World Bank's Forest Investment Programme (FIP) in Peru

In a letter addressed to senior government officials, representatives of the FIP and its international donors, AIDESEP highlight that the current effort to develop an investment plan fails to respect the rights of Peru's indigenous peoples. The letter highlights how failure to respect these rights not only violate the international legal obligations of Peru but also the FIP's own operational guidelines.

Indigenous organisations of the Loreto region in Peru advise their communities not to sign any REDD agreement while no legal and policy framework for REDD exists that protects their rights. April 2012

Indigenous organisations warn that this could otherwise result in the loss of control over their forests. To prevent REDD deals that take advantage of communities they urge the Ministry of Environment and the Regional Government of Loreto to declare that until REDD legislation exists that guarantees these rights then any such agreements have no legal validity.

Click here for further information (in Spanish only).

AIDESEP letter to FIP and FCPF highlighting their continued concerns with the National REDD strategy in Peru being financed by the World Bank

On the eve of the World Bank's Forest Investment Programme (FIP) joint mission to Peru and the meeting of the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) Partcipants Commitee in Asuncion (PC 11), the national Indigenous Amazonian peoples federation of Peru (AIDESEP) have sent a letter to the FIP and FCPF informing them of their serious concerns regarding the development of the FIP strategy for Peru and the broader national REDD strategy.

FPP E-Newsletter February 2012 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Balancing human beings’ need for decent livelihoods against the imperative of securing our environment is, arguably, the biggest challenge facing our planet. This struggle between ‘development’ and ‘conservation’ is being played out in global policy negotiations, with the decisions of so-called policy-makers being imposed on the ground. But not everything is or should be ‘top down’. Enduring solutions also spring from the grassroots, from the ‘bottom up’.

Durban COP 17: UNFCCC fudges decision on climate finance and makes little progress on REDD+ safeguard implementation

Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) at their recent COP17 did not support performance indicators for reporting on the implementation of indigenous peoples’ rights in REDD+. However, they did recognise that REDD+ benefits have to go beyond carbon to include biodiversity conservation and support for local livelihoods.

Forest Peoples Programme, with a delegation of indigenous peoples from Guyana, Kenya, Cameroon, Suriname and Peru, attended preparatory negotiations and the 17th Conference of the Parties of the UNFCCC in Durban, South Africa, in late November/early December 2011. The main purpose of FPP’s attendance was to support the Indigenous Peoples’ Caucus and closely follow negotiations on REDD+ safeguards and finance.