Resources

FPP E-Newsletter October 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

The principle that the enjoyment of human rights is both the means and the goal of development, highlights the importance of human rights monitoring as a means for empowering rights-holders to exercise their rights, whilst holding States and other actors accountable for their human rights obligations.   

Bulletin d'information FPP Octobre 2013 (PDF Version)

Chers amis, 

Le principe selon lequel la jouissance des droits humains constitue à la fois le moyen et l’objectif du développement souligne l’importance du suivi des droits humains comme un moyen de permettre aux détenteurs de droits d’exercer leurs droits, tout en rendant les États et les autres acteurs responsables de leurs obligations en matière de droits humains. 

FPP E-Newsletter December 2012 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

The importance of ensuring respect for the rights of forest peoples’ to control their forests, lands and livelihoods, becomes ever clearer and yet more contested. As the articles in this edition of our newsletter starkly reveal, land and resource grabs are not just being imposed by commercial developers but are being actively promoted by governments, whose principle responsibility should be to protect the rights of citizens. Yet these same impositions are also being resisted, sometimes at great personal cost, by local communities and indigenous peoples.

Shipibo communities in the Peruvian Amazon reject implementation of the Imiria Conservation Area for violation of their rights as indigenous peoples

Representatives of 12 Shipibo indigenous communities and neighbouring villages from the Imiria lake region in Ucayali, Peru have expressed their opposition to the Imiria Regional Conservation Area (RCA-Imiria), a protected area established by the Regional government of Ucayali. The RCA-Imiria was created in 2010 but the communities denounce the fact that it overlaps their traditional territory including the titled lands of seven communities.

FPP E-Newsletter February 2012 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Balancing human beings’ need for decent livelihoods against the imperative of securing our environment is, arguably, the biggest challenge facing our planet. This struggle between ‘development’ and ‘conservation’ is being played out in global policy negotiations, with the decisions of so-called policy-makers being imposed on the ground. But not everything is or should be ‘top down’. Enduring solutions also spring from the grassroots, from the ‘bottom up’.

FPP Bulletin d'Information Février 2012 (PDF Version)

Chers amis,

Trouver un équilibre entre le besoin des êtres humains de moyens de subsistance décents et l’impératif de protection de notre environnement est probablement le plus grand défi que notre planète doit relever. Cette lutte entre « développement » et « conservation » se déroule lors des négociations politiques mondiales, et les décisions de ceux que l’on appelle les décideurs politiques s’imposent sur le terrain. Mais tout ne vient pas ou ne devrait pas venir du haut. Des solutions durables émergent également du niveau local, depuis le bas.

FPP Bulletin d'Information Février 2012 (PDF Version)

Chers amis,

Trouver un équilibre entre le besoin des êtres humains de moyens de subsistance décents et l’impératif de protection de notre environnement est probablement le plus grand défi que notre planète doit relever. Cette lutte entre « développement » et « conservation » se déroule lors des négociations politiques mondiales, et les décisions de ceux que l’on appelle les décideurs politiques s’imposent sur le terrain. Mais tout ne vient pas ou ne devrait pas venir du haut. Des solutions durables émergent également du niveau local, depuis le bas.

Indigenous peoples and biodiversity conservation in Latin America: From principles to practice

Book available on request from FPP office: info@forestpeoples.org

Conservation agencies now recognise indigenous peoples' rights to ownership and control of their lands and resources, but how has this new partnership turned out in practice? Fifteen original case studies from Latin America provide practical lessons in how the interests of indigenous peoples and conservation objectives can be reconciled.