Resources

Developing the global post-2020 framework to protect biodiversity

This technical submission into the CBD process for elaborating a post-2020 global biodiversity framework provides views from the International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity, the International Women’s Biodiversity Network, Forest Peoples Programme, and several indigenous peoples' organisations and networks.

International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity (IIFB) Statement to the Press, Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea

Press release from the press conference held by IIFB at the 12th meeting of the Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity.The press release addresses an impasse that has emerged within the negotiations concerning the use of the terminology "Indigenous Peoples and local communities" to replace the current phrase "indigenous and local communities".IIFB Press Statement

FPP E-Newsletter December 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

What are the prospects for securing the land rights of indigenous peoples, local communities, and women in the foreseeable future?

Significantly, the report of the United Nations Secretary-General’s High Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda, under Goal 1 to “End Poverty”, sets a target to “Increase by x% the share of women and men, communities, and businesses with secure rights to land, property, and other assets”.

FPP E-Newsletter July 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Mutual recognition, mutual respect and mutual benefit are among the desirable attributes of all human relationships. Indigenous peoples and other forest peoples also expect these qualities in their relationships with others – be they governments, private corporations, NGOs or other indigenous peoples’ organisations and communities. This issue of Forest Peoples Programme’s E-Newsletter reports on the state of various relationships between forest peoples and different institutions – as these are forged, tested or broken –in the course of assertions for upholding basic human rights, social justice and solidarity.

Lembar Berita Elektronik FPP Juli 2013 (versi PDF)

Teman-teman terhormat,

Saling mengakui, saling menghormati dan saling menguntungkan adalah atribut-atribut yang diinginkan dari semua hubungan manusia. Masyarakat adat dan masyarakat-masyarakat hutan lainnya juga mengharapkan hal-hal ini dalam hubungan mereka dengan orang lain – apakah dengan pemerintah, perusahaan swasta, NGO atau organisasi masyarakat adat dan komunitas lainnya. Edisi Lembar Berita Elektronik Forest Peoples Programme kali ini melaporkan keadaan hubungan-hubungan antara masyarakat hutan dengan berbagai lembaga – seraya hubungan-hubungan ini dibina, diuji atau pecah – dalam perjalanan penegasan untuk menegakkan hak asasi manusia, keadilan sosial dan solidaritas.

Video: Workshop on customary sustainable use at Conference of the World Indigenous Network

The inaugural Conference of the World Indigenous Network (WIN) took place in Darwin, Australia from 26 to 31 May 2013. The WIN conference was designed to build a strong foundation for an innovative and enduring network of land and sea managers, with a programme aimed at coming together, connecting and sharing stories and experiences of indigenous peoples and local communities who have an active role in managing natural environments. Read more about the WIN here: http://www.worldindigenousnetwork.net/ 

Video: Lokakarya tentang pemanfaatan berkelanjutan berbasis adat pada Konferensi Jaringan Adat Dunia (World Indigenous Network)

Dari hari Minggu 26 Mei 2013 sampai hari Jumat 31 Mei 2013 Konferensi Jaringan Adat Dunia (WIN) perdana berlangsung di Darwin, Australia. Konferensi ini dirancang untuk membangun fondasi yang kuat untuk sebuah Jaringan Adat Dunia yang inovatif dan kokoh, dengan program yang ditujukan untuk Masyarakat Adat dan Komunitas Lokal yang memiliki peran aktif dalam mengelola lingkungan alam, untuk datang bersama-sama, bertemu dan berbagi cerita dan pengalaman. Baca lebih lanjut tentang WIN di sini: http://www.worldindigenousnetwork.net/ 

Parties to the Biodiversity Convention not ready to accept ‘indigenous peoples’

A disappointing outcome for indigenous peoples at the 11th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP11) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in Hyderabad, India, 8-19 October 2012: Parties failed to adopt a decision to update the CBD’s terminology ‘indigenous and local communities’ to ‘indigenous peoples and local communities’, due to the resistance of a few Parties.

Para Pihak dari Konvesi Keanekaragaman Hayati belum siap menerima ‘masyarakat adat’

Sebuah hasil yang mengecewakan bagi masyarakat adat pada pertemuan ke-11 Conference of the Parties (COP11) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) di Hyderabad, India, 8-19 Oktober 2012: Para Pihak gagal mengadopsi keputusan untuk memperbarui terminologi “komunitas adat dan komunitas lokal” yang digunakan CBD menjadi “masyarakat adat dan komunitas lokal”, akibat tentangan beberapa pihak.

FPP E-Newsletter December 2012 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

The importance of ensuring respect for the rights of forest peoples’ to control their forests, lands and livelihoods, becomes ever clearer and yet more contested. As the articles in this edition of our newsletter starkly reveal, land and resource grabs are not just being imposed by commercial developers but are being actively promoted by governments, whose principle responsibility should be to protect the rights of citizens. Yet these same impositions are also being resisted, sometimes at great personal cost, by local communities and indigenous peoples.

New publication: Indigenous Peoples in Decisions of the Convention on Biological Diversity (Working Draft)

Many decisions of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) contain language on indigenous peoples and local communities*, for instance on their full and effective participation, impacts on their lands and livelihoods, the value and contribution of their traditional knowledge and customary sustainable use, and the need for support in capacity building.

Sustainable Development Update: Building resilience through customary sustainable use of biodiversity

"Since almost a decade back, the Resilience and Development Programme (SwedBio) and partners such as Forest Peoples ProgrammeTebtebba Foundation and the International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity (IIFB) have been working for strengthening governance in indigenous territories based on customary sustainable use. The work by SwedBio and partners was initiated by supporting good cases, including presenting them and describing the key factors for success behind. These pilot cases, covering a broad range of social ecological systems, have successively formed a base for building better international policies that adopt customary sustainable use (CSU) as a means for strengthened resilience of biological diversity and contribution to human wellbeing among indigenous peoples and local communities."

Karen People forcibly expelled from the Kaeng Krachan National Park in Thailand

In January, indigenous peoples’ organisations sent a letter to the Prime Minister of Thailand, Yingluck Shinawatra, asking her to take immediate action to redress the forcible expulsion of Karen people from their ancestral territory in north-western Thailand, which is now overlapped by the Kaeng Krachan National Park.

According to sources that have visited Kaeng Krachan National Park and collected information, the harassment of Karen villagers has been going on for some time and became severe in May, June and July 2011, when many of the villagers’ houses and rice stores were burned and money, jewellery, fishing and agricultural tools were stolen by a group comprising National Park wardens and military forces. As a result, some of these villagers moved away and are now staying with relatives elsewhere and a number of them (allegedly around 70 people) are hiding in the forest in fear of meeting government officers, and are without sufficient food and shelter.