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The Maninjau Resolution

The Maninjau Resolution

28th January 2016

Wilmar’s broken promises: we want action not just pledges

The world’s largest palm oil trading company, Wilmar International Ltd. (F34.SI / WLIL.SI), promised ‘Zero Exploitation’ throughout its supply chain alongside its commitment to ‘Zero Deforestation’. As human rights workers and NGOs that support the rights of the indigenous peoples and local communities in Indonesia and internationally, we NGOs who assembled here near Lake Maninjau in West Sumatra on 26-28 January 2016, declare the following.

Resolusi Maninjau

Resolusi Maninjau28 Januari 2016

Wilmar, “Kami butuh tindakan bukan ikrar”

Perusahaan perdagangan minyak sawit terbesar dunia, Wilmar International Ltd. (F34.SI / WLIL.SI), berikrar untuk menjalankan kebijakan ‘Nol Eksploitasi’ atau ‘Zero Exploitation’ di seluruh rantai pasoknya seiring dengan komitmennya untuk ‘Nol Deforestasi’. Sebagai NGO dan pegiat Hak Asasi Manusia (HAM) yang mendukung hak-hak masyarakat adat dan komunitas lokal -baik di Indonesia maupun di dunia, kami, sejumlah NGO dan masyarakat yang berkumpul di lereng bukit tepi Danau Maninjau, Sumatra Barat, 26-28 Januari 2016, menyampaikan pernyataan-pernyataan berikut:

Harapan Rainforest conservation project urged to respect forest peoples' rights

Following sustained efforts to persuade the international rainforest conservation project to respect forest peoples' rights, local NGO Scale Up and Forest Peoples Programme have written a joint letter to the project managers (PT REKI) requesting effective follow up on their commitment to have mediated dialogues with the affected communities. The project, an Ecological Restoration permit issued in an old logging concession, overlaps the lands of forest peoples locally known as Batin Sembilan.

The World Bank’s Palm Oil Policy

In 2011, the World Bank Group (WBG) adopted a Framework and Strategy for investment in the palm oil sector. The new approach was adopted on the instructions of former World Bank President Robert Zoellick, after a damning audit by International Finance Corporation’s (IFC) semi-independent Compliance Advisory Ombudsman (CAO) had shown that IFC staff were financing the palm oil giant, Wilmar, without due diligence and contrary to the IFC’s Performance Standards. Wilmar is the world’s largest palm oil trader, supplying no less than 45% of globally traded palm oil. The audit, carried out in response to a series of detailed complaints[1] from Forest Peoples Programme and partners, vindicated many of our concerns that Wilmar was expanding its operations in Indonesia in violation of legal requirements, Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) standards and IFC norms and procedures. Almost immediately after the audit was triggered, IFC divested itself of its numerous other palm oil investments in Southeast Asia.

Kebijakan Minyak Sawit Bank Dunia

Tahun 2011, Kelompok Bank Dunia [World Bank Group] mengesahkan satu Kerangka Kerja dan Strategi untuk investasi dalam sektor minyak sawit. Pendekatan baru ini disyahkan atas instruksi mantan Presiden Bank Dunia Robert Zoellick, setelah audit yang memalukan oleh badan semi independen Compliance Advisory Ombudsman (CAO) International Finance Corporation (IFC) yang menunjukan bahwa staf IFC mendanai raksasa minyak sawit, Wilmar, tanpa uji tuntas dan bertentangan Standar Kinerja IFC.

A Política do Banco Mundial sobre o Óleo de Palma

Em 2011, o Grupo Banco Mundial (WBG na sigla em inglês) adotou um Quadro e Estratégia para investimentos no setor de óleo de palma. A nova abordagem foi adotada sob instruções do ex-presidente do Banco Mundial, Robert Zoellick, depois de uma condenatória auditoria realizada pelo Compliance Advisory Ombudsman - CAO - (Ouvidor para a Verificação do Cumprimento das Regras) da International Finance Corporation - IFC- (Corporação Financeira Internacional) ter revelado que o pessoal da IFC estava financiando o gigante do óleo de palma, Wilmar[1], sem a devida diligência, e contrário às Normas de Desempenho da IFC. Wilmar é o maior comerciante de óleo de palma do mundo, abastecendo nada menos que 45% do óleo de palma comercializado mundialmente. A auditoria, realizada em resposta a uma série de reclamações detalhadas do Forest Peoples Programme e dos seus parceiros, confirmou muitas das nossas preocupações de que Wilmar estava expandindo suas operações na Indonésia, em violação às exigências legais, normas da Mesa Redonda sobre Óleo de Palma Sustentável (RSPO na sigla em inglês) e as normas e procedimentos da IFC. Quase imediatamente depois do início da auditoria, a IFC desfez-se dos seus outros inúmeros investimentos em óleo de palma no sudeste da Ásia.

Indonesia: controversial pulp and paper giant APP comes under scrutiny as it plans expansion but makes new promises

Asia Pulp and Paper (APP) is coming under intensifying scrutiny over its renewed promises to bring its giant mills and supply chains into compliance with best practice norms for sustainability and its new promises that it will respect the rights of local communities and indigenous peoples. Recently, Marcus Colchester, as Co-Chair of the High Conservation Values Resource Network and Director of FPP, and Patrick Anderson, FPP's Policy Advisor in Indonesia, met with APP's Head of Sustainability, Aida Greenbury, and her team of advisers and consultants, to clarify the company's commitments.

FPP E-Newsletter February 2012 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Balancing human beings’ need for decent livelihoods against the imperative of securing our environment is, arguably, the biggest challenge facing our planet. This struggle between ‘development’ and ‘conservation’ is being played out in global policy negotiations, with the decisions of so-called policy-makers being imposed on the ground. But not everything is or should be ‘top down’. Enduring solutions also spring from the grassroots, from the ‘bottom up’.

The Importance of Mainstreaming Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) in Tenurial Conflict Resolution in Indonesia

A summary of ADR studies in Riau, West Sumatra, Jambi and South Sumatra, Indonesia, by Ahmad Zazali, Executive Director, Scale Up

An ongoing and heated debate is underway over the neglect of public access rights over forest resources in current modes of forest tenure in Indonesia. The role of local communities and their access to natural resources often overlap with the rights accorded to government/state enterprises and the private sector. The exploitation of forest resources has driven large companies to ignore the interests of these communities who live within and depend on forests for their livelihoods. This situation in turn has triggered the emergence of intra- and inter-community social conflict, conflict between communities and the government, as well as conflict between communities and companies.

Since the reform and the implementation of decentralisation policies, natural resource conflicts have become increasingly prevalent in Indonesia. The National Land Agency (BPN) reports that at least 7,491 natural resource conflicts have been dealt with by BPN and the Indonesian police. The Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) recorded 359 forest-related conflicts from January 1997 to June 2003. The highest frequency of conflicts occurred in 2000 with 153 recorded cases, or 43% of the total number of cases recorded over those 6 years. Conflicts in ​​Industrial Plantation Forests (HTI) were the highest at 39%, with conservation areas (including protected forests and national parks) representing 34% of conflict cases, and forest concessions (HPH) representing 27%.

Lessons from the field: REDD+ and the rights of indigenous peoples and forest dependent communities

In October 2011, Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) conducted a survey of our local partners asking them to pinpoint key experiences and emerging lessons learned in relation to REDD+ and rights issues over the last three years. Partners who contributed include the Centre for Environment and Development (CED) and Association Okani (Cameroon), CEDEN (DRC), Foundation for the Promotion of Traditional Knowledge (Panama), Amerindian Peoples Association (Guyana), Association of Village Leaders in Suriname, Association of Saamaka Authorities (Suriname), AIDESEP (Peru), Federation for the Self-Determination of Indigenous Peoples (Paraguay) and Scale-up, Pusaka and FPP field staff (Indonesia). Observations and lessons are also drawn from workshops with local partners, field studies and issues stemming from indigenous peoples’ representatives in dialogues with national and international REDD+ policy-makers. Key observations and lessons are summarised below.