Resources

The Maninjau Resolution

The Maninjau Resolution

28th January 2016

Wilmar’s broken promises: we want action not just pledges

The world’s largest palm oil trading company, Wilmar International Ltd. (F34.SI / WLIL.SI), promised ‘Zero Exploitation’ throughout its supply chain alongside its commitment to ‘Zero Deforestation’. As human rights workers and NGOs that support the rights of the indigenous peoples and local communities in Indonesia and internationally, we NGOs who assembled here near Lake Maninjau in West Sumatra on 26-28 January 2016, declare the following.

Resolusi Maninjau

Resolusi Maninjau28 Januari 2016

Wilmar, “Kami butuh tindakan bukan ikrar”

Perusahaan perdagangan minyak sawit terbesar dunia, Wilmar International Ltd. (F34.SI / WLIL.SI), berikrar untuk menjalankan kebijakan ‘Nol Eksploitasi’ atau ‘Zero Exploitation’ di seluruh rantai pasoknya seiring dengan komitmennya untuk ‘Nol Deforestasi’. Sebagai NGO dan pegiat Hak Asasi Manusia (HAM) yang mendukung hak-hak masyarakat adat dan komunitas lokal -baik di Indonesia maupun di dunia, kami, sejumlah NGO dan masyarakat yang berkumpul di lereng bukit tepi Danau Maninjau, Sumatra Barat, 26-28 Januari 2016, menyampaikan pernyataan-pernyataan berikut:

The World Bank’s Palm Oil Policy

In 2011, the World Bank Group (WBG) adopted a Framework and Strategy for investment in the palm oil sector. The new approach was adopted on the instructions of former World Bank President Robert Zoellick, after a damning audit by International Finance Corporation’s (IFC) semi-independent Compliance Advisory Ombudsman (CAO) had shown that IFC staff were financing the palm oil giant, Wilmar, without due diligence and contrary to the IFC’s Performance Standards. Wilmar is the world’s largest palm oil trader, supplying no less than 45% of globally traded palm oil. The audit, carried out in response to a series of detailed complaints[1] from Forest Peoples Programme and partners, vindicated many of our concerns that Wilmar was expanding its operations in Indonesia in violation of legal requirements, Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) standards and IFC norms and procedures. Almost immediately after the audit was triggered, IFC divested itself of its numerous other palm oil investments in Southeast Asia.

Kebijakan Minyak Sawit Bank Dunia

Tahun 2011, Kelompok Bank Dunia [World Bank Group] mengesahkan satu Kerangka Kerja dan Strategi untuk investasi dalam sektor minyak sawit. Pendekatan baru ini disyahkan atas instruksi mantan Presiden Bank Dunia Robert Zoellick, setelah audit yang memalukan oleh badan semi independen Compliance Advisory Ombudsman (CAO) International Finance Corporation (IFC) yang menunjukan bahwa staf IFC mendanai raksasa minyak sawit, Wilmar, tanpa uji tuntas dan bertentangan Standar Kinerja IFC.

Lessons from the field: REDD+ and the rights of indigenous peoples and forest dependent communities

In October 2011, Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) conducted a survey of our local partners asking them to pinpoint key experiences and emerging lessons learned in relation to REDD+ and rights issues over the last three years. Partners who contributed include the Centre for Environment and Development (CED) and Association Okani (Cameroon), CEDEN (DRC), Foundation for the Promotion of Traditional Knowledge (Panama), Amerindian Peoples Association (Guyana), Association of Village Leaders in Suriname, Association of Saamaka Authorities (Suriname), AIDESEP (Peru), Federation for the Self-Determination of Indigenous Peoples (Paraguay) and Scale-up, Pusaka and FPP field staff (Indonesia). Observations and lessons are also drawn from workshops with local partners, field studies and issues stemming from indigenous peoples’ representatives in dialogues with national and international REDD+ policy-makers. Key observations and lessons are summarised below.

FPP Series on Rights, Forests and Climate - October 2011: REDD+ in Indonesia

OverviewFor several years the Forest Peoples Programme has worked with the national NGO Pusaka and local partners in six Indonesian provinces and at the national level, to help indigenous peoples, local communities and local NGOs understand REDD+ and the obligations on governments and  REDD+ developers to respect community rights. These briefings draw on this work and review REDD+ developments in Aceh, Riau, Central Kalimantan, Central Sulawesi, Papua and West Papua and at the national level, from the perspective of the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities.