Resources

Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads

Click here to read related PRESS RELEASE.

Read this report in English or in Bahasa Indonesia

Growing global demand for palm oil is fuelling the large-scale expansion of oil palm plantations across Southeast Asia and Africa. Concerns about the environmental and social impacts of the conversion of vast tracts of land to monocrop plantations led in 2004 to the establishment of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), which encourages oil palm expansion in ways that do not destroy high conservation values or cause social conflict. Numerous international agencies have also called for reforms of national frameworks to secure communities’ rights and to develop sound land governance.

Konflik atau Mufakat? Sektor Kelapa Sawit di Persimpangan Jalan

Silakan klik di sini untuk membaca press release terkait.

Baca laporan dalam bahasa Indonesia atau bahasa Inggris. 

Meningkatnya permintaan global untuk minyak sawit tengah memacu ekspansi besar-besaran perkebunan kelapa sawit di Asia Tenggara dan Afrika. Kekhawatiran timbul atas dampak lingkungan dan sosial dari konversi lahan yang sangat luas untuk perkebunan monokultur menyebabkan pembentukan forum minyak sawit berkelanjutan (Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil / RSPO) pada tahun 2004 yang mendorong ekspansi kelapa sawit dengan cara yang tidak merusak nilai-nilai konservasi yang tinggi atau menyebabkan konflik sosial. Berbagai lembaga internasional juga menyerukan reformasi kerangka kerja nasional untuk mengamankan hak-hak masyarakat dan tata kelola lahan yang baik.

New Report: “We who live here own the land” - Customary Land Tenure in Grand Cape Mount, and Community Recommendations for Reform of Liberia’s Land Policy & Law

This document, and the consultations on which it is based, is intended to enable communities in Sime Darby affected areas in Grand Cape Mount, Liberia, to have their voice heard at the national level, so that government law and policy (in particular that relating to land and natural resources) can in future fit with community customary practices and community self-determined development priorities, and prevent future conflict of the kind experienced in relation to the Sime Darby concession in Grand Cape Mount.

New briefing: Free, Prior and Informed Consent and the RSPO; Are the companies keeping their promises? Findings and recommendations from Southeast Asia and Africa

This briefing, launched on the occasion of the 10th Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RT10), draws together the key findings of fourteen studies on FPIC in RSPO member/certified plantations based on the RSPO Principles & Criteria (P&C) and related Indicators and Guidance, and makes recommendations for reforms in the way palm oil companies honour the principle of FPIC and respect customary rights to land.

Keputusan Bebas, Didahulukan dan Diinformasikan (Free, Prior and Informed Consent) dan Round Table on Sustainable Palm Oil: Apakah perusahaan menepati janji-janji mereka?

Hak atas Keputusan Bebas, Didahulukan dan Diinformasikan (KBDD) dalan Prinsip dan Kriteria Round Table on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) menetapkan bagaimana kesepakatan yang adil antara masyarakat lokal dan perusahaan (dan pemerintah) dapat dikembangkan melalui cara yang menjamin dihormatinya hak-hak hukum dan hak-hak adat masyarakat adat dan pemegang hak-hak lokal lainnya.[1] Dari bulan Maret sampai Oktober 2012, bersamaan dengan Tinjaun Prinsip dan Kriteria RSPO,[2] Forest Peoples Programme dan mitra-mitra lokalnya[3] melakukan serangkaian penelitian independen atas KBDD di perkebunan-perkebunan kelapa sawit di Asia Tenggara dan Afrika. Tujuan dari penelitian-penelitian tersebut adalah untuk menyediakan informasi lapangan yang rinci tentang bagaimana dan apakah hak atas KBDD telah diterapkan oleh perusahaan, untuk menyingkap malpraktik yang dilakukan perusahaan kelapa sawit, dan untuk mendesak penguatan prosedur dan standar RSPO jika diperlukan.

Liberia: Agri-business expansion threatens forests and local communities’ livelihoods

Agri-business expansion in Africa is a major threat to the forests and livelihoods of African peoples. Where governance is weak and the rights of local communities and indigenous peoples are insecure, agricultural development is disadvantaging local people.

Awareness of the social and ecological impact of agri-business expansion in South East Asia has led to new standards for acceptable palm oil development. The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), a third-party voluntary certification process, has adopted a set of Principles and Criteria that is substantially consistent with a rights-based approach, and which seeks to divert palm oil expansion away from primary forests and areas of critical High Conservation Value (HCV) while prohibiting the takeover of customary lands without communities’ Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC). Increasingly, adherence to the RSPO standard is becoming a requirement for access to the European market and major palm oil producing conglomerates seeking to maintain market share are now members of the RSPO.