Resources

World Bank’s Draft Safeguards Fail to Protect Land Rights and Prevent Impoverishment: Major Revisions Required

97 non-governmental organizations and civil society networks and 17 distinguished individuals from Asia-Pacific, Africa, Latin America, North America and Europe sent this collaborative statement to the World Bank’s Board, demanding that the draft be sent back to the drawing board and re-written with serious safeguards to respect and protect the land, housing and livelihood rights of the poor.

View the statement here

Civil Society Statement on ESS6- Biodiversity, World Bank Environmental and Social Framework CODE Draft

Proposed changes to safeguards for forests, natural habitats and biodiversity raise serious concerns among civil society organisations around the world. These concerns have been raised with the Committee on Development Effectiveness (CODE), the Board committee tasked with determining if the current draft proposals are ready for public consultation.

Civil Society Statement ESS6 Biodiversity

Latin American and Caribbean civil society organisations concerns on the World Bank Environmental and Social Policy and Environmental and Social Standards First Draft

49 civil society organisations in Latin America and the Caribbean sent a collective statement to the World Bank highlighting their concerns with the structural changes to safeguard policies in the Bank being proposed that would, if adopted, weaken social and environmental standards for affected peoples and the environment.

Rear the statement here (PDF):

English

World Bank Safeguard Draft Rolls-Back Protections for People and the Environment Key Human Rights Concerns

A statement from the Bank on Human Rights Coalition submitted to the World Bank Executive Board. The World Bank has repeatedly committed to producing a new safeguard framework that results in no-dilution of the existing safeguards and which reflects prevailing international standards. Instead, the draft safeguard framework distributed this month to the Committee on Development Effectiveness represents a profound dilution of the existing safeguards and an undercutting of international human rights standards and best practice among development institutions.

Final Statement on Draft World Bank Safeguard Policy

This statement, prepared jointly by the Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) and the Forest Peoples Programme (FPP), contains views and recommendations for improving the draft for the second round of consultations. We have been engaging in the review process since it was launched in 2011 and we hope that the dilutions to the current safeguard policies shall be addressed properly, and the added provisions such as the on the free prior and informed consent of indigenous peoples be strengthened, along with the legal recognition of the rights of indigenous peoples to their lands and resources.

EC holds conference on deforestation challenges and solutions

On 26-27 May 2014 the Environment Directorate, the Development Directorate and the Climate Directorate of the European Commission jointly hosted a high-level international meeting on solutions to global deforestation and forest degradation and their implications for climate change, development and biodiversity loss.

CSO letter on support for CAO

CSO letter to the President of the World Bank Group expressing support for the office of the Compliance Advisor Ombudsman (CAO).

World Bank to undermine regional and global legal standards on indigenous peoples' rights

The World Bank has been reviewing its suite of safeguard policies since late 2010 (see prior FPP newsletters from May 2014, Oct 2013, April 2013, Oct 2012 and Oct 2011). The Bank has spent these past 4 years in ‘listening mode’ as thousands of comments came in from constituencies around the world with little or no concrete feedback from the Bank. Much is at stake with this process of review, as the Bank seeks to incorporate critical project level protections for social and environmental outcomes into the wider process of reform in the Bank overseen by President Kim.

Negotiations on future climate convention still at inception stage, while concerns on impact of climate actions on indigenous peoples' rights remain marginal

The recent United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) sessions in Bonn for a draft negotiating text for the Conference of the Parties (COP20) in Peru will resume in October. In the meantime discussions showed low concern on human-rights implications of climate-change related actions in particular land-based mitigation.

Action on land rights and FPIC are key to effective forest and climate initiatives - finds new APA and FPP special report on Guyana

Guyana has been a major proponent of international funding for avoided deforestation in tropical countries. In 2009 the government signed an MOU with the Kingdom of Norway under an agreement to reduce deforestation, pursue low carbon (non-fossil fuel) development and enter into negotiations with the EU on a trade treaty under the Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) initiative. Almost five years after the signing of this bilateral agreement, how are indigenous peoples’ rights and local benefit sharing issues being addressed in Guyana’s land use, forest and climate policies?

Indonesia needs political reform, not just legal prosecution, to eradicate corruption in palm oil plantations

The article looks at the links between oil palm business and public officials. It comes to the conclusion that the prosecution of corrupt officials is failing to stop corruption by elected officials, and that reform of electoral funding laws is needed so that politicians and political parties do not have to reply on bribes or oligarchs to fund their election campaigns.

To read the full article please click here

 

The Batwa Petition Before Uganda's Constitutional Court

Author: United Organisation for Batwa Development in Uganda (UOBDU)

On 8th February 2013, the Batwa of Uganda submitted a petition to the Constitutional Court of Uganda seeking recognition of their status as indigenous peoples under international law and redress for the historic marginalisation and continuous human rights violations they have experienced as a result of being dispossessed of their ancestral forest lands by the government.

Before their eviction, the Batwa had lived in the forest since immemorial times. The measures taken to remove the Batwa, to create ‘environmentally protected’ areas, and to limit access and use of Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Mgahinga Gorilla National Park and Echuya Central Forest Reserve, resulted in the violation of the Batwa’s property rights over their ancestral lands. While colonial protection of the forest started in the 1920s, most Batwa continued to live in the forest and to use its resources until the 1990s; when they were evicted, without consultation, adequate compensation or offer of alternative land.

Deforestation, REDD and Takamanda National Park in Cameroon - a Case Study

While focusing in particular on the German financing of rainforest protection in Cameroon, this report also covers the broader issue of how Cameroon’s forest policies are shaped by the REDD process. It takes a case study approach, examining the way such forest protection policies impact on local communities by focusing in on the specific example of those communities whose land has been overlaid by the Takamanda National Park.

Unidos para la defensa de los Derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas

Federación por la Autoderterminación de los Pueblos Indígenas (FAPI)

“FAPI Informa”, una revista que publica las acciones y luchas de las doce asociaciones indígenas que conforman la organización.

El primer número de la revista de la Federación por la Autodeterminación por los Pueblos Indígenas (FAPI) se publica este mes de junio. Esta edición incluye notas que tienen que ver con acciones, actividades y luchas que llevan adelante los líderes de las doce asociaciones que conforman la  FAPI.