Resources

FPP E-Newsletter December 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

What are the prospects for securing the land rights of indigenous peoples, local communities, and women in the foreseeable future?

Significantly, the report of the United Nations Secretary-General’s High Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda, under Goal 1 to “End Poverty”, sets a target to “Increase by x% the share of women and men, communities, and businesses with secure rights to land, property, and other assets”.

Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads

Click here to read related PRESS RELEASE.

Read this report in English or in Bahasa Indonesia

Growing global demand for palm oil is fuelling the large-scale expansion of oil palm plantations across Southeast Asia and Africa. Concerns about the environmental and social impacts of the conversion of vast tracts of land to monocrop plantations led in 2004 to the establishment of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), which encourages oil palm expansion in ways that do not destroy high conservation values or cause social conflict. Numerous international agencies have also called for reforms of national frameworks to secure communities’ rights and to develop sound land governance.

Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads

Pour lire ce rapport en anglais ou en indonésien.

La croissance de la demande mondiale en huile de palme favorise l’expansion à grande échelle des plantations de palmiers à huile en Asie du Sud-Est et en Afrique.  Les préoccupations concernant les impacts environnementaux et sociaux de la conversion de vastes étendues de terre en plantations de monocultures ont motivé la mise en place, en 2004, de la Table ronde pour la production durable de l’huile de palme (RSPO), qui encourage l’expansion de la production de palmiers à huile sans que celle-ci entraîne la destruction de hautes valeurs de conservation ni des conflits sociaux.  De nombreux organismes internationaux ont également réclamé la réforme des cadres nationaux afin de sauvegarder les droits des communautés et d’établir une bonne gouvernance foncière.

Press Release - Sustainable Palm Oil: Marketing Ploy or True Commitment? New Research Questions Effectiveness of RSPO Standards

MEDAN, INDONESIA (7 November, 2013)—Members of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) are violating the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities in the forests and peatlands of tropical nations worldwide, according to a new research publication released today. The study details the performance of 16 oil palm operations, many run by RSPO members, reporting on their failure to uphold human rights and environmental standards required.

FPP E-Newsletter July 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Mutual recognition, mutual respect and mutual benefit are among the desirable attributes of all human relationships. Indigenous peoples and other forest peoples also expect these qualities in their relationships with others – be they governments, private corporations, NGOs or other indigenous peoples’ organisations and communities. This issue of Forest Peoples Programme’s E-Newsletter reports on the state of various relationships between forest peoples and different institutions – as these are forged, tested or broken –in the course of assertions for upholding basic human rights, social justice and solidarity.

Bulletin d'information FPP Juillet 2013 (PDF Version)

Chers amis,

La reconnaissance mutuelle, le respect mutuel et les avantages réciproques figurent parmi les attributs souhaitables de toute relation humaine. Les peuples autochtones et les autres peuples des forêts s’attendent eux aussi à trouver ces qualités dans leurs relations avec des tiers, qu’il s’agisse de gouvernements, d’entreprises privées, d’ONG ou d’autres organisations et communautés de peuples autochtones. Cette édition du bulletin d’information du Forest Peoples Programme rend compte du statut de diverses relations entre les peuples des forêts et différentes institutions, au fur et à mesure de leur établissement, mise à l’épreuve ou rupture, suite à des revendications en faveur du respect des droits humains fondamentaux, de la justice sociale et de la solidarité.

The World Bank’s Palm Oil Policy

In 2011, the World Bank Group (WBG) adopted a Framework and Strategy for investment in the palm oil sector. The new approach was adopted on the instructions of former World Bank President Robert Zoellick, after a damning audit by International Finance Corporation’s (IFC) semi-independent Compliance Advisory Ombudsman (CAO) had shown that IFC staff were financing the palm oil giant, Wilmar, without due diligence and contrary to the IFC’s Performance Standards. Wilmar is the world’s largest palm oil trader, supplying no less than 45% of globally traded palm oil. The audit, carried out in response to a series of detailed complaints[1] from Forest Peoples Programme and partners, vindicated many of our concerns that Wilmar was expanding its operations in Indonesia in violation of legal requirements, Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) standards and IFC norms and procedures. Almost immediately after the audit was triggered, IFC divested itself of its numerous other palm oil investments in Southeast Asia.

Politique de la Banque mondiale en matière d’huile de palme

En 2011, le Groupe de la Banque mondiale (GBM) a adopté un cadre et une stratégie d’investissement dans le secteur de l’huile de palme. La nouvelle approche a été adoptée sur instruction de l’ancien Président de la Banque mondiale, Robert Zoellick, après un audit accablant du Compliance Advisory Ombudsman (CAO) semi-indépendant de la Société financière internationale (SFI), qui constatait que la SFI finançait le géant de l’huile de palme, Wilmar, sans faire preuve de la diligence requise et de façon contraire aux normes de performance de la SFI. Wilmar est le plus grand négociant d’huile de palme au monde, fournissant pas moins de 45 % de l’huile de palme commercialisée à l’échelle globale. L’audit, effectué en réponse à une série de plaintesdétaillées du Forest Peoples Programme et de ses partenaires, a confirmé nombre de nos préoccupations quant au fait que Wilmar développait ses activités en Indonésie en violation des prescriptions légales, des normes de la RSPO et des normes et procédures de la SFI. Presque immédiatement après la mise en place de l'audit, la SFI a renoncé à ses nombreux autres investissements dans le secteur de l’huile de palme en Asie du Sud-Est.

Safeguards and the Private Sector: Emerging lessons from voluntary standards and commodity roundtables

Public indignation about the depredations of ill-regulated business has led to a growing recognition of the responsibilities of businesses to respect human rights, as well as the need for stronger regulations to improve the way products are made and ensure that environments and peoples’ rights are respected and protected. There is now greater awareness that what is urgently needed is strengthened environmental stewardship and land governance, reforms of land tenure, and improved enforcement of revised and just laws.

Les normes volontaires du secteur privé

L’indignation générale concernant les déprédations d’un commerce mal réglementé a conduit à la reconnaissance croissante des responsabilités des entreprises de respecter les droits humains, ainsi que de la nécessité de réglementations renforcées afin d’améliorer la façon dont les produits sont fabriqués et de s’assurer que l’environnement et les droits des personnes soient respectés et protégés.

Video: Rethinking Foreign Direct Investments in Agriculture in South East Asia

This video, produced by the UNDP-UNEP Poverty-Environment Initiative (PEI), includes interviews with individuals from various NGOs, including FPP and Sawit Watch, during the Public Forum on Inclusive, Sustainable Foreign Direct Investments in Agriculture in South East Asia which took place in Bangkok in March 2013.

FPP E-Newsletter December 2012 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

The importance of ensuring respect for the rights of forest peoples’ to control their forests, lands and livelihoods, becomes ever clearer and yet more contested. As the articles in this edition of our newsletter starkly reveal, land and resource grabs are not just being imposed by commercial developers but are being actively promoted by governments, whose principle responsibility should be to protect the rights of citizens. Yet these same impositions are also being resisted, sometimes at great personal cost, by local communities and indigenous peoples.

Making Palm Oil Accountable?

Globally oil palm plantations continue to expand at a rapid rate. World leader, Indonesia, has raced past Malaysia to become the number one producer. Latest data from the Indonesian watchdog NGO, SawitWatch, suggests that oil palm plantations in Indonesia now cover 11 million hectares, up from 6 million hectares only five years ago. New plantings are spreading to the smaller islands of the archipelago and to the less developed areas of eastern Indonesia. Hopes that a Presidential promise of a 2 year moratorium on forest clearance would slow the crop’s expansion – part of a deal to reduce green house gas emissions - have also evaporated as the government has excepted areas where preliminary permits have already been handed out.

Rendre l’huile de palme responsable ?

Les plantations de palmier à huile continuent de s’étendre au niveau mondial à une cadence rapide. Le leader mondial du secteur, l’Indonésie, a devancé la Malaisie pour devenir le premier producteur au monde. Les données les plus récentes d’une ONG indonésienne qui surveille les développements, SawitWatch,  indiquent que les plantations de palmier à huile en Indonésie recouvrent désormais 11 millions d’hectares, alors qu’elles recouvraient 6 millions d’hectares il y a seulement cinq ans. De nouvelles plantations se propagent aux îles plus petites de l'archipel, et aux zones moins avancées de l'Indonésie orientale. Les espoirs liés à une promesse du Président d’instaurer un moratoire de deux ans sur la déforestation pour freiner l’expansion de cette culture (dans le cadre d’un accord pour réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre) se sont également évanouis, puisque le gouvernement a exclu les zones pour lesquelles des permis préliminaires ont déjà été accordés.