Resources

Nepal: Identity and equality is all that indigenous women want

Source: MyRepublica

The contours of “New Nepal” we all dream of cannot be shaped without appropriately addressing the concerns being raised by the indigenous women, who comprise half the female population. Traditionally, these women enjoyed greater degree of freedom and socioeconomic status than those from the so-called high caste Hindu groups such as Bahun, Chhetri, and Thakuri, who were restricted by pervasive patriarchy and religious orthodoxy. Unlike these women of the Indo-Aryan origin, the indigenous women were adept in handicrafts and other enterprises and freely participated in socio-cultural events. They faced no restriction during menstruation and were even free to choose their life partner and to remarry if they became single. They were also less affected by the dowry system.

Recent reports and submissions

1. Destruction at Dawn: The Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the Republic of Nepal

An in-depth report into the development of the Arun III hydropower project and the challenges it, and projects like it, pose to the Nepali government commitments to protect the rights and interests of indigenous peoples (LAHURNIP, NGO-FONIN and FPP). 

Soumissions et rapports récents

1. Destruction at Dawn: The Rights of Indigenous Peoples in Nepal (Destruction à l’aube : Les droits des peuples autochtones dans la République du Népal)

Un rapport détaillé concernant le développement du projet d’énergie hydraulique Arun III et les défis que ce projet et d’autres projets similaires posent pour les engagements en faveur de la protection des droits et des intérêts des peuples autochtones du gouvernement népalais (LAHURNIP, NGO-FONIN et FPP). 

Indigenous women raise their voices at CEDAW

In July, the 49th Session of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) met in New York. Indigenous women in Nepal, under the umbrella of the Nepal Indigenous Women’s Federation (NIWF), attended the session for the first time to defend and explain the findings that they had presented to the Committee in their Shadow Report. 

The report was supported also by the Lawyer’s Association for the Human Rights of Nepal’s Indigenous Peoples (LAHURNIP) and by the Forest Peoples Programme, and represented the first national level, self-researched and written, report on the status of indigenous women in the newly emerging Nepalese republic.

Les femmes autochtones font entendre leurs voix auprès du CEDAW

En juillet dernier, la 49e session du Comité pour l’élimination de la discrimination à l’égard des femmes (CEDAW) s’est tenue à New York. Les femmes autochtones du Népal, sous l’égide de la Fédération des femmes autochtones du Népal (NIWF), ont participé pour la première fois à cette session afin de défendre et d’expliquer les résultats présentés au Comité dans leur rapport alternatif. 

Le rapport était également soutenu par la Lawyer’s Association for the Human Rights of Nepal’s Indigenous Peoples (LAHURNIP) et par le Forest Peoples Programme, et constituait le premier rapport national fondé sur des recherches et une élaboration autonomes concernant le statut des femmes autochtones dans la nouvelle république émergente du Népal.

The Rights of Indigenous Women in Nepal

A shadow report to the 49th Session of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), jointly submitted by the National Indigenous Women's Federation (NIWF), the Lawyers' Association for Human Rights of Nepalese Indigenous Peoples (LAHURNIP) and Forest Peoples Programme (FPP).