Resources

Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads

Click here to read related PRESS RELEASE.

Read this report in English or in Bahasa Indonesia

Growing global demand for palm oil is fuelling the large-scale expansion of oil palm plantations across Southeast Asia and Africa. Concerns about the environmental and social impacts of the conversion of vast tracts of land to monocrop plantations led in 2004 to the establishment of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), which encourages oil palm expansion in ways that do not destroy high conservation values or cause social conflict. Numerous international agencies have also called for reforms of national frameworks to secure communities’ rights and to develop sound land governance.

Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads

Lea este informe en inglés o bahasa indonesia.

La creciente demanda mundial de aceite de palma está avivando la expansión a gran escala de plantaciones de palma de aceite por todo el sudeste de Asia y por África. La preocupación por las consecuencias ambientales y sociales de la conversión de vastas extensiones de tierra en plantaciones de monocultivo condujo al establecimiento en 2004 de la Mesa Redonda sobre el Aceite de Palma Sostenible (RSPO por sus siglas en inglés), la cual fomenta la expansión de la palma de aceite de maneras que no destruyan altos valores de conservación ni causen conflictos sociales. Numerosas agencias internacionales también han pedido reformas de los marcos nacionales para asegurar los derechos de las comunidades y establecer una gobernanza de la tierra buena y responsable.

“A sweetness like unto death”: Voices of the indigenous Malind of Merauke, Papua

This publication is launched on the occasion of World Food Day, marked by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations with the theme of “Sustainable Food Systems for Food Security and Nutrition”. In particular, this report seeks to inform one of the key objectives of World Food Day: to encourage the participation of rural people, particularly women and the least privileged categories, in decisions and activities influencing their living conditions.

“A sweetness like unto death”: Voices of the indigenous Malind of Merauke, Papua

Este impactante informe constituye el primer estudio de campo detallado de las experiencias de comunidades con el proyecto Estado Integrado de Alimentación y Energía de Merauke (MIFEE por sus siglas en inglés) del Gobierno de Indonesia, que abarca dos millones de hectáreas. El estudio muestra que MIFEE está minando la autosuficiencia de la población local y poniendo en duda la política de seguridad alimentaria del Gobierno nacional, basada en promover las empresas de agricultura a gran escala a expensas de las comunidades locales.

Press Release - Starvation and poverty in Indonesia: civil society organisations appeal for suspension of MIFEE project in Papua pending redress for local communities

The Indonesian government has issued an industrial timber plantation licence for use on the Zanegi community’s customary lands to timber company PT Selaras Inti Semesta, a subsidiary of the Medco Group, whose concession extends over 169,400 ha, and which is one of over 80 companies operating as part of the government-sponsored Merauke Integrated Food and Energy Estate (MIFEE) agro-industrial mega-project.

Request for Further Consideration of the Situation of the Indigenous Peoples of Merauke, Papua Province, Indonesia, under the UN CERD's Urgent Action and Early Warning Procedures. 25 July 2013

The subject of this request is the extreme harm caused to indigenous Papuans by the Merauke Integrated Food and Energy Estate project (the MIFEE project), a State-initiated, agro-industrial mega-project implemented by a variety of corporate entities that, to-date, encompasses around 2.5 million hectares of traditional indigenous lands in Merauke. The affected indigenous peoples have already lost a considerable area of their lands due to acquisition by these companies and conversion to plantations of one kind or another. The irreparable harm they have already experienced continues to expand and intensify as more companies commence operations. 

The World Bank’s Palm Oil Policy

In 2011, the World Bank Group (WBG) adopted a Framework and Strategy for investment in the palm oil sector. The new approach was adopted on the instructions of former World Bank President Robert Zoellick, after a damning audit by International Finance Corporation’s (IFC) semi-independent Compliance Advisory Ombudsman (CAO) had shown that IFC staff were financing the palm oil giant, Wilmar, without due diligence and contrary to the IFC’s Performance Standards. Wilmar is the world’s largest palm oil trader, supplying no less than 45% of globally traded palm oil. The audit, carried out in response to a series of detailed complaints[1] from Forest Peoples Programme and partners, vindicated many of our concerns that Wilmar was expanding its operations in Indonesia in violation of legal requirements, Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) standards and IFC norms and procedures. Almost immediately after the audit was triggered, IFC divested itself of its numerous other palm oil investments in Southeast Asia.

La política del Banco Mundial para el aceite de palma

En 2011 el Grupo del Banco Mundial (GBM) adoptó un marco y una estrategia de inversión en el sector del aceite de palma. El nuevo planteamiento fue adoptado siguiendo las instrucciones del anterior presidente del Banco Mundial Robert Zoellick, después de que una auditoría condenatoria realizada por la Oficina del Asesor en Cumplimiento/Ombudsman (órgano semi-independiente de la Corporación Financiera Internacional [CFI]) mostrase que el personal de la CFI estaba financiando al gigante del aceite de palma Wilmar sin la diligencia debida y en contra de las normas de desempeño de la CFI. Wilmar es el mayor comerciante de aceite de palma del mundo, suministrando al menos el 45% del aceite de palma que se comercializa mundialmente. La auditoría, realizada en respuesta a una serie de quejas detalladas del Forest Peoples Programme o FPP (Programa para los Pueblos de los Bosques) y sus socios, confirmó muchas de nuestras sospechas de que Wilmar estaba ampliando sus operaciones en Indonesia violando los requisitos legales, las normas de la Mesa Redonda sobre el Aceite de Palma Sostenible (RSPO) y las normas y procedimientos de la CFI. Casi inmediatamente después de que comenzase la auditoría, la CFI se deshizo de sus numerosas inversiones de aceite de palma en el sudeste de Asia.<--break->

New briefing: Free, Prior and Informed Consent and the RSPO; Are the companies keeping their promises? Findings and recommendations from Southeast Asia and Africa

This briefing, launched on the occasion of the 10th Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RT10), draws together the key findings of fourteen studies on FPIC in RSPO member/certified plantations based on the RSPO Principles & Criteria (P&C) and related Indicators and Guidance, and makes recommendations for reforms in the way palm oil companies honour the principle of FPIC and respect customary rights to land.

El consentimiento libre, previo e informado y la Mesa Redonda sobre el Aceite de Palma Sostenible: ¿las empresas están cumpliendo sus promesas?

El derecho al consentimiento libre, previo e informado (CLPI) según se estipula en los principios y criterios de la Mesa Redonda sobre el Aceite de Palma Sostenible (RSPO por sus siglas en inglés) establece cómo se pueden desarrollar acuerdos equitativos entre comunidades locales y empresas (o gobiernos) de manera tal que aseguren el respeto de los derechos legales y consuetudinarios de los pueblos indígenas y otros titulares locales de derechos[1]. De marzo a octubre de 2012, coincidiendo expresamente con el examen de los principios y criterios de la RSPO[2], el Forest Peoples Programme y sus socios locales[3] están realizando una serie de estudios independientes de plantaciones de palma de aceite a lo largo de África y el sudeste de Asia. La finalidad de estos estudios es proporcionar información de campo detallada acerca de cómo las empresas de aceite de palma están respetando adecuadamente los derechos a la tierra y al CLPI y sí lo están haciendo, exponer cualquier conducta incorrecta de éstas y presentar argumentos a favor del fortalecimiento de los procedimientos y normas de la RSPO según sea necesario.