Resources

Enough is Enough - Stop the continued arrests and evictions of Sengwer forest indigenous peoples from their ancestral lands in Embobut Forest

In a letter to President Uhuru Kenyatta, the Sengwer call [on the President] to "stop the continued arrests and evictions of our Sengwer forest indigenous peoples from our ancestral lands (our community land) in Kaptirpai, Koropkwen and Kapkok glades in Embobut forest. We want our rights to live in, govern, manage and own our ancestral lands in the glades of Embobut forest recognized, secured, respected and protected in law, working hand in hand with state agencies to ensure effective and efficient conservation and protection of forests, water, wildlife and other natural resources therein".

Wampis autonomous government declares a state of environmental emergency after oil spill

The Wampis autonomous government has issued a Supreme Order declaring the area affected the oil spill in the community of Mayuriaga to be in a state of environmental emergency.

According to Peru’s regulatory body of the environment OEFA, 1,000 barrels of oil spilled into the community land on 3 February 2016 when a 40-year-old pipeline owned by the state oil company Petroperú ruptured.

The spill affected 400m2 of land, and flowed into the Cashacaño river, which then flows into the river Morona.

Comments on Overarching Human Rights Provisions in the World Bank’s Environmental and Social Framework

The Coalition for Human Rights in Development submitted recommendations this week urging the World Bank to amend its proposed Environmental and Social Framework to meaningfully address human rights. The submission addresses arguments that have been put forward against embracing human rights and provides concrete recommendations for strengthening the draft framework.Read more here.

The rights of Baka communities in the REDD+ Ngoyla-Mintom project in Cameroon

Of the indigenous hunter gatherer peoples of Cameroon (the peoples who self-identify as ‘autochthonous’), the Baka are the largest group, numbering about 40,000 and living in an area of 75,000 km2 in the south-west of the country; the Bagyeli/Bokola are the second-largest group with approximately 3,700 people living near the coast in an area of about 12,000 km2; and the third-largest group are the Bedzang who live in the forests north-west of Mbam (Ngambe-Tikar), in the Central Region.

NGOs call for FLEGT Action Plan to be strengthened

In this briefing, UK and European NGOs call on the EU to maintain, upgrade and strengthen its FLEGT programme. Key recommendations include the need to take specific measures to ensure that FLEGT in general, and VPAs and timber legality assurance systems specifically, include language on compliance with international human rights law as an essential element of “legality” in timber supply chains.

FPIC not FPICon: when support is not enough

FPP has released this briefing note reviewing the serious implementation challenges that the World Bank has faced in trying to meet its unique standard of ‘broad community support’ and argues for the adoption of the internationally recognised standard of free, prior and informed consent, now widely adopted by private and public sector financial institutions including by the International Finance Corporation (part of the World Bank Group).

Continuing issues with the World Bank ESF

FPP’s formal submission to the third phase of the consultations for the World Bank Safeguard Review highlight continuing concerns with adequately addressing implementation challenges, overall weakening of the ESF through transfer of responsibilities to borrowers, ambiguity about the impact on the Inspection Panel’s ability to fulfil its mandate and inadequate definition of free, prior and informed consent.

Livelihoods and forests at increased risk if land rights are ignored, says new report

Indigenous Peoples and local communities protect half the world's land, but formally own just 10 percent, according to a report released today by a global alliance of NGOs.

London, March 2nd 2016: The Global Call to Action on Indigenous and Community Land Rights, backed by more than 300 organizations all over the world, launches today with the publication of a new report.

Recognizing and expanding the territories of original peoples in Colombia is critical for the peace process

Press Note for the Global call to action on Indigenous and Community Land Rights

In Colombia, over 30% of the national territory has been officially titled to Indigenous Peoples, with some 6 million hectares of collective lands recognized for Afro-Descendant Communities. Nonetheless, in practice these territories are not recognized in the State’s actions, with mining, oil and gas, logging and other concessions issued unilaterally without upholding Indigenous or Afro-Descendant Peoples’ right to free, prior and informed consent.

Pushing for peace in Colombia: Indigenous and Afro-Descendant Peoples join forces to uphold their rights, address mining-related conflict

This report synthesizes the outcomes of Year 1 (2014-2015) of a two year inter-ethnic project between the Embera Chamí People of the Resguardo Indígena Cañamomo Lomaprieta (Riosucio, Supía – Caldas) and Afro-Descendant Communities of the Palenke Alto Cauca – Proceso de Comunidades Negras (northern Cauca) aimed at organizational strengthening and territorial defense around extractives and ethnic rights, with technical support by the Forest Peoples Programme. The project is funded by the Embassy of Norway in Colombia, and the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

Statement from the indigenous members of FAPI - Global Call to Action on Indigenous and Community Land Rights

Today on the 2nd of March, day of the Global Call to Action on Indigenous and Community Land Rights we, the members of the Federación por la Autodeterminación de los Pueblos Indígenas – FAPI (Federation for the Self-Determination of Indigenous Peoples) of Paraguay representing the indigenous community Cheiro Ara Poty, of the Mbya Guarani people, who have managed to legalize part of their customary territory after 34 years of struggles and claims, state as follows:

Press release: Wampis denounce negligence of state oil company Petroperú after oil spill devastates their territory

Community demands immediate suspension of pipeline use

London, March 2nd 2016: On the 18th February 2016 the autonomous territorial government of the indigenous Wampis people (Wampis GTA) submitted a formal complaint to Peru’s regulatory body for the environment (OEFA) accusing the state oil company (Petroperú) of gross negligence for its failure to prevent and contain the oil spill in the Wampis community of Mayuriaga. As a preventative measure the Wampis GTA demand that the pumping of oil along a branch of the pipeline is suspended.