Resources

FPP statement on Survival International's complaint against WWF

Following the recent article in The Ecologist by Lewis Evans of Survival International concerning a complaint to the OECD brought by Survival against the Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF), Forest Peoples Programme has received some queries regarding our view of the situation in Cameroon (where we have a substantial programme working alongside forest indigenous peoples). FPP has limited knowledge of the specific facts of the complaint made by Survival International and cannot corroborate its contents.

Exploring the link between culture and biodiversity – CBD COP13

The important link between cultural and biological diversity was highlighted as part of the “Múuch'tambal” Summit on Indigenous Experience: Traditional Knowledge, biological and cultural diversity at COP13 today.

Among those speaking at the thirteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD COP13) were indigenous peoples and local communities from around the world, including Mexico, Japan, Chile, and the Solomon Islands.

Interview with Milka Chepkorir: Sengwer women in Kenya and their struggle for land rights

Milka Chepkorir Kuto is a human rights activist and member of the Sengwer indigenous people, who live in the the Embobut and Kabolet Forest, Kenya. For the last three years, Milka has been focusing on indigenous women and their role in defending land rights. In occasion of the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence, we have spoken to Milka about her work and the importance of including women in the struggle to retain ownership and control over their lands. 

How can the EU WaTER Project help secure, not undermine, human rights in Kenya?

There is increasing concern from local, national and international civil society about the human rights implications of the EU’s €31 million Water Tower Protection and Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Project (WaTER) that is focused on an area of Kenya with deeply troubling human rights issues.

Interview with Arnobia Moreno on women and indigenous land rights in Colombia

Arnobia Moreno lives in the indigenous Resguardo Cañamomo Lomaprieta, one of the oldest colonial reserves in Colombia. Over the years she has played a key role in involving women in the protection and conservation of their traditional land. As part of the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence, Arnobia told us about the importance of the Collective of Indigenous Women, which she helped creating, and her work to obtain the restitution of the original territory of the indigenous communities living in the Resguardo. 

Agreement reached on unified High Carbon Stocks method

Bangkok: Major palm oil producers and environmental NGOs announced today their agreement on a method to decide which forests must be conserved for companies to uphold their ‘no deforestation’ commitments. Forest Peoples Programme, which has been engaging closely in the process (links), welcomed the outcome.

New environmental and social standards at the World Bank and the AIIB

A recent Position paper by the German Institute for Human Rights argues that the newly developed standards of the multilateral Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) and of the World Bank fall short in many respects of the human rights commitments that the Federal Government has imposed on itself. If Germany wishes to achieve the objectives it has set for itself, it will have to conduct its own human rights assessment of projects, and close monitoring of project implementation will be equally necessary.

Indigenous women in Central Africa “increasingly vulnerable” when it comes to access to land

A wide-ranging discussion on the rights of indigenous women in Africa was held last Sunday at the 59th Ordinary Session of the African Commission on Human Rights and Peoples Rights.  The panel, organised by the Commission’s Working Group on Indigenous Populations, looked at different aspects, including access to services, barriers to participation in decision-making and harmful traditional practices.

UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination adopts NGO submissions on human rights in Papua

Following the submission of inputs on the human rights situation in Indonesia and Papua by indigenous peoples' organisations for the UN Universal Periodic Review in September 2016, the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) has considered, under its early warning and urgent action procedure, allegations of excessive use of force, arrests, killings and torture of persons belonging to the Papuan indigenous people in West Papua, Indonesia

UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (UNCERD) expresses serious concerns about the situation of the Karen people evicted from Kaeng Krachan

In an unusually strongly worded formal communication to the Royal Thai Government, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination has expressed its serious concerns regarding the eviction of Karen communities from the area of Kaeng Krachan National Park, and the subsequent nomination of the park as part of a World Heritage Site.

World Bank undermines decades of progress on building protections for the rights of indigenous peoples

On the 4th of August 2016, the Executive Board of the World Bank approved its new safeguard approach, detailed in a text called the ‘Environmental and Social Framework’.

The Environmental and Social Framework (ESF) is intended to contribute to the so-called ‘twin goals’ of the Bank: eliminating extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity. It defines the approach that the World Bank will take to assess and minimise negative impacts from World Bank investments, and promote social and environmental goods.

Communities make their voices heard in palm oil discussions

Communities in Liberia have spoken to palm oil sector representatives about ongoing land tenure issues and participation of peoples in future plans for their customary lands.

Sixteen representatives from across Liberia attended the 2nd Annual Tropical Forest Alliance 2020 (TFA) National Dialogue to talk about the future of both their lands and large-scale agricultural developments in the country.

FPP plans and priorities for CBD COP13 in Cancun, Mexico

The thirteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD COP13) will be held in Cancun, Mexico, from 4 to 17 December 2016. For indigenous peoples and local communities this will be a platform to highlight their contributions to the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity and celebrate the importance and vibrancy of traditional knowledge and cultural diversity.

A New Platform for Indigenous Peoples in Cameroon

Indigenous forest peoples in Cameroon have come together to form an official platform to better represent their views locally, nationally and internationally. For the first time in Cameroon, representatives from more than fifty indigenous Baka and Bagyeli communities have united to form a national organisation to represent Cameroon’s forest peoples and defend their rights at the local, national and international levels.

World Bank turns its back on pastoral communities

Guest article from Helen Tugendhat in the Bretton Woods Project Observer regarding the World Bank’s decision to grant a waiver of OP4.10 for an agricultural investment project in Tanzania.

Click here to read the article (offsite link)

Thailand: Karens to appeal court verdict legalizing their forced evictions; indigenous organizations call for effective redress

Karen representatives today vowed to appeal against the recent Thai court verdict that ruled the authorities did not break the law in burning their properties to forcefully evict them from Kaeng Krachan National Park. Indigenous rights groups have called for effective redress for the affected communities saying that the ruling violated international human rights law.

Community response to Liberia's Forest Development Authority (FDA) concerning the TFA 2020 Africa Palm Oil Initiative

The Tropical Forest Alliance 2020 is a global public-private partnership, designed to remove deforestation from the palm oil, beef, soya, and pulp and paper sectors.  In Liberia it focuses on the palm oil sector and has previously worked with the government, private sector and civil society to produce a series of nine guiding principles designed to regulate the sector in Liberia.