Resources

Sengwer Women’s Experiences of Evictions

Since the 1960s, the Sengwer peoples of western Kenya have been experiencing forced evictions from their home in the name of conservation. Since 2014, these evictions have intensified.

Behind the Veil: Transparency, Access to Information and Community Rights in Cameroon's Forestry Sector

In 2010, Cameroon and the European Union signed a Voluntary Partnership Agreement on forest law enforcement, governance and trade in timber and derived products. One apparently positive element highlighted by the European Union and civil society organisations has been the inclusion of a 'transparency annex' in the document, which aimed to "make information available for public scrutiny to improve transparency and accountability".

Derrière la voile: transparence, l'accès à l'information et droits communautaires dans le secteur forestier au Cameroon

En 2010, le Cameroun et l’Union européenne ont signé un Accord de partenariat volontaire (APV) sur l’application des réglementations forestières, la gouvernance et les échanges commerciaux des bois et produits dérivés. Un élément en apparence positif mis en évidence par l'Union européenne et les organisations de la société civile a été l'inclusion d’une « annexe sur la transparence » dans le document, qui avait pour but de « mettre les informations à la disposition du public afin d'améliorer la transparence et l'obligation de rendre compte».

Securing Forest Peoples’ Rights and Tackling Deforestation in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Deforestation and forest degradation have increased in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), despite the government’s commitment to safeguard its forests.

Illegal logging, unsustainable mining, commercial agriculture, and urban demand for fuelwood represent only some of the major long-term threats to the forests. By contrast, the traditional livelihood strategies of indigenous and local communities show a capacity to coexist with forests sustainably.

Sécuriser les droits des peuples forestiers et combattre la déforestation en République démocratique du Congo

La déforestation et la dégradation des forêts ont augmenté en République démocratique du Congo (RDC) malgré l’engagement du gouvernement de protéger ses forêts. Les activités commerciales d’envergure industrielle constituent d’importantes menaces directes à long terme sur les forêts. En revanche, les strategies et modes de subsistance traditionnelles des communautés autochtones et locales montrent qu’elles peuvent coexister durablement avec les forêts.

The rights of Baka communities in the REDD+ Ngoyla-Mintom project in Cameroon

Of the indigenous hunter gatherer peoples of Cameroon (the peoples who self-identify as ‘autochthonous’), the Baka are the largest group, numbering about 40,000 and living in an area of 75,000 km2 in the south-west of the country; the Bagyeli/Bokola are the second-largest group with approximately 3,700 people living near the coast in an area of about 12,000 km2; and the third-largest group are the Bedzang who live in the forests north-west of Mbam (Ngambe-Tikar), in the Central Region.

Respecting Rights? Assessing Oil Palm Companies’ Compliance with FPIC Obligations: A case study of EPO and KLK LIBINC Estate in Grand Bassa, Liberia

This review is the result of several years of fieldwork by the Sustainable Development Institute (SDI), and is the first step of a UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) funded project that examines putting into practice in Liberia the FAO Technical Guide entitled ‘Respecting free, prior and informed consent, Practical guidance for governments, companies, NGOs, indigenous peoples and local communities in relation to land acquisition’.

Respecting Rights? Assessing Oil Palm Companies’ Compliance with FPIC Obligations: A case study of Maryland Oil Palm Plantation in south-eastern Liberia

This review is the result of several years of fieldwork by the Liberian civil society organisation Social Entrepreneurs for Sustainable Development (SESDev), in partnership with the UK-based Forest Peoples Programme (FPP), and is part of a UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) funded project that examines putting into practice in Liberia the FAO Technical Guide entitled ‘Respecting free, prior and informed consent, Practical guidance for governments, companies, NGOs, indigenous peoples and local communities in relation to land acquisition’.