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Parties to the Biodiversity Convention not ready to accept ‘indigenous peoples’

A disappointing outcome for indigenous peoples at the 11th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP11) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in Hyderabad, India, 8-19 October 2012: Parties failed to adopt a decision to update the CBD’s terminology ‘indigenous and local communities’ to ‘indigenous peoples and local communities’, due to the resistance of a few Parties.

Para Pihak dari Konvesi Keanekaragaman Hayati belum siap menerima ‘masyarakat adat’

Sebuah hasil yang mengecewakan bagi masyarakat adat pada pertemuan ke-11 Conference of the Parties (COP11) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) di Hyderabad, India, 8-19 Oktober 2012: Para Pihak gagal mengadopsi keputusan untuk memperbarui terminologi “komunitas adat dan komunitas lokal” yang digunakan CBD menjadi “masyarakat adat dan komunitas lokal”, akibat tentangan beberapa pihak.

Sustainable Development Update: Building resilience through customary sustainable use of biodiversity

"Since almost a decade back, the Resilience and Development Programme (SwedBio) and partners such as Forest Peoples ProgrammeTebtebba Foundation and the International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity (IIFB) have been working for strengthening governance in indigenous territories based on customary sustainable use. The work by SwedBio and partners was initiated by supporting good cases, including presenting them and describing the key factors for success behind. These pilot cases, covering a broad range of social ecological systems, have successively formed a base for building better international policies that adopt customary sustainable use (CSU) as a means for strengthened resilience of biological diversity and contribution to human wellbeing among indigenous peoples and local communities."

Karen People forcibly expelled from the Kaeng Krachan National Park in Thailand

In January, indigenous peoples’ organisations sent a letter to the Prime Minister of Thailand, Yingluck Shinawatra, asking her to take immediate action to redress the forcible expulsion of Karen people from their ancestral territory in north-western Thailand, which is now overlapped by the Kaeng Krachan National Park.

According to sources that have visited Kaeng Krachan National Park and collected information, the harassment of Karen villagers has been going on for some time and became severe in May, June and July 2011, when many of the villagers’ houses and rice stores were burned and money, jewellery, fishing and agricultural tools were stolen by a group comprising National Park wardens and military forces. As a result, some of these villagers moved away and are now staying with relatives elsewhere and a number of them (allegedly around 70 people) are hiding in the forest in fear of meeting government officers, and are without sufficient food and shelter.