Resources

Protecting forests, natural ecosystems and human rights: a case for EU action

In its Communication on “Stepping up EU Action to Protect and Restore the World’s Forests”, published on 23rd July 2019, the European Commission recognised that the EU consumption represents around 10% of the global share of deforestation embodied in total final consumption of commodities such as palm oil, beef, soy, cocoa, maize, timber and rub

9th Southeast Asia Conference on Business & Human Rights

Between 27-30 October 2019, representatives from indigenous peoples’ organisations, civil society and National Human Rights Institutions from across Southeast Asia are coming together in Subic Bay, the Philippines for the 9th Southeast Asia conference on human rights and business.

Joint letter to end EU complicity in Amazon fires

In light of the forest fires in Brazil, Forest Peoples Programme and others ask the EU to urgently address complicity in current deforestation crisis and instruct the European Commission to work on EU regulation to end deforestation.

La plateforme nationale camerounaise pour les peuples autochtones des forêts se réunit pour sa deuxième Assemblée Générale

Les 23 et 24 juillet, sous le couvert de la forêt communautaire Nomedjo à Lomié, la plateforme Gbabandi s'est réunie pour sa deuxième Assemblée Générale. Gbabandi comprend actuellement huit organisations autochtones, et plus de 100 Baka et Bagyeli ont participés à cette réunion de deux jours, venant de différentes régions forestières du Cameroun.

All eyes on the incoming European Commission to step up action to eliminate human rights violations, land grabbing and deforestation from EU supply chains

The long-awaited European Commission Communication on deforestation opens the door for regulation of EU commodity supply chains, in order to protect and restore the world’s forests. On the downside, the Communication lacks the ambition and additional actionable commitments required to tackle the global forest and climate crisis. We share our views.

How the Women of Indonesia Rose up Against Land Grabbing

Land conflicts impact both indigenous men and women, but the burden often falls disproportionately on the latter. As food producers, knowledge holders, caretakers, healers, and keepers of culture, loss of access to valuable natural resources means a loss of self-reliance for the women, causing not only physical displacement but also economic and social difficulties.