Resources

Terre sans titre - les Bagyeli d'Océan

Au cours des 3 dernières années, quatre communautés bagyeli autochtones ont cartographié et surveillé leurs forêts afin de garantir les droits sur les terres dont elles dépendent pour survivre.

Behind the Veil: Transparency, Access to Information and Community Rights in Cameroon's Forestry Sector

In 2010, Cameroon and the European Union signed a Voluntary Partnership Agreement on forest law enforcement, governance and trade in timber and derived products. One apparently positive element highlighted by the European Union and civil society organisations has been the inclusion of a 'transparency annex' in the document, which aimed to "make information available for public scrutiny to improve transparency and accountability".

Derrière la voile: transparence, l'accès à l'information et droits communautaires dans le secteur forestier au Cameroon

En 2010, le Cameroun et l’Union européenne ont signé un Accord de partenariat volontaire (APV) sur l’application des réglementations forestières, la gouvernance et les échanges commerciaux des bois et produits dérivés. Un élément en apparence positif mis en évidence par l'Union européenne et les organisations de la société civile a été l'inclusion d’une « annexe sur la transparence » dans le document, qui avait pour but de « mettre les informations à la disposition du public afin d'améliorer la transparence et l'obligation de rendre compte».

Deforestation, REDD and Takamanda National Park in Cameroon - a Case Study

While focusing in particular on the German financing of rainforest protection in Cameroon, this report also covers the broader issue of how Cameroon’s forest policies are shaped by the REDD process. It takes a case study approach, examining the way such forest protection policies impact on local communities by focusing in on the specific example of those communities whose land has been overlaid by the Takamanda National Park.

FPP Field Report Central African Republic/Dzanga Reserve, February/March 2011

IntroductionForest Peoples Programme staff have recently returned from two weeks in the Central African Republic where we were working with the Bayaka Community Union and the World Wildlife Fund in the context of the EU-funded, Government of Central Africa Republic-implemented, and WWF-supported Dzanga Sangha project in which FPP is a partner. The objective of the EU project is to promote and improve local and especially indigenous livelihoods and sustainable development in the Dzanga Special Reserve in the context of increased protection for community rights, along with improved access to health and education services. The project is especially targeting the indigenous population of Bayaka forest huntergatherer communities, and the Sangha Sangha people, now a minority group traditionally based predominately along the rivers of the region. This EU project is one of a number of donor-funded projects implemented by the government, with technical and financial support from WWF, which together enable the Dzanga- Sangha Special Reserve to operate.

Free, Prior and Informed Consent - Making FPIC work for Forests and Peoples

The right of indigenous peoples to give or withhold their free prior and informed consent to projects, laws and policies that may affect their rights is affirmed in international law. Making this right effective is more challenging: and what should private sector companies do to ensure they respect this right? This 'scoping paper'has been prepared by FPP for The Forests Dialogue to stimulate an interactive discussion about how to respect FPIC in practice among all those concerned about forests and rights.

Scoping paper prepared for The Forest Dialogue's (TFD) FPIC Initiative.