Resources

Protecting forests, natural ecosystems and human rights: a case for EU action

In its Communication on “Stepping up EU Action to Protect and Restore the World’s Forests”, published on 23rd July 2019, the European Commission recognised that the EU consumption represents around 10% of the global share of deforestation embodied in total final consumption of commodities such as palm oil, beef, soy, cocoa, maize, timber and rub

Human rights experts set the record straight for the World Bank

Indigenous rights experts have written to the World Bank President and Executive Board to underscore the importance of the World Bank adopting a standard of free, prior and informed consent for indigenous peoples potentially affected by development initiatives funded by the Bank. In the letter, the experts point out that the existing standard of Broad Community Support used by the Bank has failed to improve outcomes for development initiatives, and is a standard that is implemented ineffectively and inconsistently across the Bank’s portfolio. 

Securing Forest Peoples’ Rights and Tackling Deforestation in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Deforestation and forest degradation have increased in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), despite the government’s commitment to safeguard its forests.

Illegal logging, unsustainable mining, commercial agriculture, and urban demand for fuelwood represent only some of the major long-term threats to the forests. By contrast, the traditional livelihood strategies of indigenous and local communities show a capacity to coexist with forests sustainably.

Sécuriser les droits des peuples forestiers et combattre la déforestation en République démocratique du Congo

La déforestation et la dégradation des forêts ont augmenté en République démocratique du Congo (RDC) malgré l’engagement du gouvernement de protéger ses forêts. Les activités commerciales d’envergure industrielle constituent d’importantes menaces directes à long terme sur les forêts. En revanche, les strategies et modes de subsistance traditionnelles des communautés autochtones et locales montrent qu’elles peuvent coexister durablement avec les forêts.

Secure territorial rights of indigenous peoples and traditional knowledge must be central to post-conflict initiatives to save the Colombian Amazon and achieve sustainable development

Bogotá, April 25: A new report “Deforestation and indigenous peoples rights in the Colombian Amazon” co-published by social justice and environmental NGO DEDISE and Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) underlines the critical role of secure land and territorial rights and traditional knowledge in sustaining one of the most culturally and biologically diverse forests on the planet.

El Asegurar los derechos territoriales y el conocimiento tradicional de los pueblos indígenas son fundamentales para las iniciativas post conflicto destinadas a salvar la Amazonía colombiana y lograr un desarrollo sostenible

Bogotá, abril 25, 2016: Un nuevo informe titulado “Deforestación, políticas nacionales y derechos de los pueblos indígenas en la Amazonía colombiana”, co-publicado por la ONG de justicia social y ambiental DEDISE y el Forest Peoples Programme (FPP), resalta el papel crítico que juegan los derechos a la tierra y territoriales seguros y el conocimiento tradicional en el mantenimiento de uno de los bosques con mayor diversidad cultural y biológica que existe en el planeta.

FPIC not FPICon: when support is not enough

FPP has released this briefing note reviewing the serious implementation challenges that the World Bank has faced in trying to meet its unique standard of ‘broad community support’ and argues for the adoption of the internationally recognised standard of free, prior and informed consent, now widely adopted by private and public sector financial institutions including by the International Finance Corporation (part of the World Bank Group).

Baram Dam Declaration

Participants at the World Indigenous Summit on Environment and Rivers, WISER Baram 2015, hosted by the grassroots network SAVE Rivers collectively produced a declaration that acknowledges the widespread suffering and destruction caused by dams, and stresses the importance of obtaining Free, Prior, and Informed Consent from communities impacted by dam building.

Nepali Communities Seek Justice for Violations in World Bank Project

Kathmandu, Nepal, July 14, 2015 – Last week an independent investigation revealed serious abuses in a World Bank-funded transmission line project in central Nepal. The Khimti-Dhalkebar transmission line runs through indigenous and rural communities, who have been raising concerns about the project for over five years. Though the findings validate community concerns, the World Bank has not committed to correcting the damage caused by its failures in this project.