Resources

The World Bank’s Palm Oil Policy

In 2011, the World Bank Group (WBG) adopted a Framework and Strategy for investment in the palm oil sector. The new approach was adopted on the instructions of former World Bank President Robert Zoellick, after a damning audit by International Finance Corporation’s (IFC) semi-independent Compliance Advisory Ombudsman (CAO) had shown that IFC staff were financing the palm oil giant, Wilmar, without due diligence and contrary to the IFC’s Performance Standards. Wilmar is the world’s largest palm oil trader, supplying no less than 45% of globally traded palm oil. The audit, carried out in response to a series of detailed complaints[1] from Forest Peoples Programme and partners, vindicated many of our concerns that Wilmar was expanding its operations in Indonesia in violation of legal requirements, Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) standards and IFC norms and procedures. Almost immediately after the audit was triggered, IFC divested itself of its numerous other palm oil investments in Southeast Asia.

La política del Banco Mundial para el aceite de palma

En 2011 el Grupo del Banco Mundial (GBM) adoptó un marco y una estrategia de inversión en el sector del aceite de palma. El nuevo planteamiento fue adoptado siguiendo las instrucciones del anterior presidente del Banco Mundial Robert Zoellick, después de que una auditoría condenatoria realizada por la Oficina del Asesor en Cumplimiento/Ombudsman (órgano semi-independiente de la Corporación Financiera Internacional [CFI]) mostrase que el personal de la CFI estaba financiando al gigante del aceite de palma Wilmar sin la diligencia debida y en contra de las normas de desempeño de la CFI. Wilmar es el mayor comerciante de aceite de palma del mundo, suministrando al menos el 45% del aceite de palma que se comercializa mundialmente. La auditoría, realizada en respuesta a una serie de quejas detalladas del Forest Peoples Programme o FPP (Programa para los Pueblos de los Bosques) y sus socios, confirmó muchas de nuestras sospechas de que Wilmar estaba ampliando sus operaciones en Indonesia violando los requisitos legales, las normas de la Mesa Redonda sobre el Aceite de Palma Sostenible (RSPO) y las normas y procedimientos de la CFI. Casi inmediatamente después de que comenzase la auditoría, la CFI se deshizo de sus numerosas inversiones de aceite de palma en el sudeste de Asia.<--break->

Indonesia: controversial pulp and paper giant APP comes under scrutiny as it plans expansion but makes new promises

Asia Pulp and Paper (APP) is coming under intensifying scrutiny over its renewed promises to bring its giant mills and supply chains into compliance with best practice norms for sustainability and its new promises that it will respect the rights of local communities and indigenous peoples. Recently, Marcus Colchester, as Co-Chair of the High Conservation Values Resource Network and Director of FPP, and Patrick Anderson, FPP's Policy Advisor in Indonesia, met with APP's Head of Sustainability, Aida Greenbury, and her team of advisers and consultants, to clarify the company's commitments.

FPP Series on Rights, Forests and Climate - October 2011: REDD+ in Indonesia

OverviewFor several years the Forest Peoples Programme has worked with the national NGO Pusaka and local partners in six Indonesian provinces and at the national level, to help indigenous peoples, local communities and local NGOs understand REDD+ and the obligations on governments and  REDD+ developers to respect community rights. These briefings draw on this work and review REDD+ developments in Aceh, Riau, Central Kalimantan, Central Sulawesi, Papua and West Papua and at the national level, from the perspective of the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities.