Resources

The World Bank’s Palm Oil Policy

In 2011, the World Bank Group (WBG) adopted a Framework and Strategy for investment in the palm oil sector. The new approach was adopted on the instructions of former World Bank President Robert Zoellick, after a damning audit by International Finance Corporation’s (IFC) semi-independent Compliance Advisory Ombudsman (CAO) had shown that IFC staff were financing the palm oil giant, Wilmar, without due diligence and contrary to the IFC’s Performance Standards. Wilmar is the world’s largest palm oil trader, supplying no less than 45% of globally traded palm oil. The audit, carried out in response to a series of detailed complaints[1] from Forest Peoples Programme and partners, vindicated many of our concerns that Wilmar was expanding its operations in Indonesia in violation of legal requirements, Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) standards and IFC norms and procedures. Almost immediately after the audit was triggered, IFC divested itself of its numerous other palm oil investments in Southeast Asia.

La política del Banco Mundial para el aceite de palma

En 2011 el Grupo del Banco Mundial (GBM) adoptó un marco y una estrategia de inversión en el sector del aceite de palma. El nuevo planteamiento fue adoptado siguiendo las instrucciones del anterior presidente del Banco Mundial Robert Zoellick, después de que una auditoría condenatoria realizada por la Oficina del Asesor en Cumplimiento/Ombudsman (órgano semi-independiente de la Corporación Financiera Internacional [CFI]) mostrase que el personal de la CFI estaba financiando al gigante del aceite de palma Wilmar sin la diligencia debida y en contra de las normas de desempeño de la CFI. Wilmar es el mayor comerciante de aceite de palma del mundo, suministrando al menos el 45% del aceite de palma que se comercializa mundialmente. La auditoría, realizada en respuesta a una serie de quejas detalladas del Forest Peoples Programme o FPP (Programa para los Pueblos de los Bosques) y sus socios, confirmó muchas de nuestras sospechas de que Wilmar estaba ampliando sus operaciones en Indonesia violando los requisitos legales, las normas de la Mesa Redonda sobre el Aceite de Palma Sostenible (RSPO) y las normas y procedimientos de la CFI. Casi inmediatamente después de que comenzase la auditoría, la CFI se deshizo de sus numerosas inversiones de aceite de palma en el sudeste de Asia.<--break->

South East Asian Human Rights Commissioners and Indigenous Peoples’ Organisations adopt Bali Declaration on Human Rights and Agribusiness

Constructive dialogue and potential synergies between the National Human Rights Commissions and Institutions of Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines and Cambodia, reached an important milestone at a four-day workshop in November in Bali, Indonesia. The workshop was convened by the Indonesian National Human Rights Commission and organised by Forest Peoples Programme and Indonesian NGO SawitWatch, with the support of the Rights and Resources Initiative, Samdhana Institute and RECOFTC – The Center for People and Forests.

This landmark workshop on “Human Rights and Business: Plural Legal Approaches to Conflict Resolution, Institutional Strengthening and Legal Reform” was attended by 60 participants, including notable academics, indigenous peoples’ representatives and members of supportive national and international NGOs. An opening statement was made by UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, Olivier de Schutter, and a presentation was delivered by Raja Devasish Roy, elected Member of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNFPII) and traditional chief of the Chakma circle in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh.

Comisionados de derechos humanos y organizaciones de pueblos indígenas del sudeste de Asia adoptan la Declaración de Bali sobre Derechos Humanos y Agroindustria

En un taller de cuatro días celebrado en noviembre en Bali, Indonesia, se logró un hito de gran importancia gracias al diálogo constructivo y a las posibles sinergias entre las comisiones e instituciones nacionales de derechos humanos de Indonesia, Malasia, Tailandia, Filipinas y Camboya. El taller fue convocado por la Comisión Nacional de Derechos Humanos de Indonesia y organizado por el Forest Peoples Programme o FPP (Programa para los pueblos de los Bosques) y la ONG indonesia Sawit Watch, con el apoyo de la Iniciativa para los Derechos y los Recursos, el Instituto Samdhana y RECOFTC - The Center for People and Forests  (El Centro para los Pueblos y los Bosques, traducción no oficial).

En este histórico taller sobre «Los derechos humanos y las actividades empresariales: enfoques jurídicos plurales de la resolución de conflictos, el fortalecimiento institucional y la reforma jurídica» hubo 60 participantes, entre los que se incluían distinguidos académicos, representantes de pueblos indígenas y miembros de ONG nacionales e internacionales que los apoyan. El Relator especial de la ONU sobre el derecho a la alimentación, Olivier de Schutter, dio el discurso inaugural, y Raja Devasish Roy, miembro elegido del Foro Permanente de las Naciones Unidas para las Cuestiones Indígenas (UNPFII por sus siglas en inglés) y jefe tradicional del círculo Chakma en la región montañosa de Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh, ofreció una presentación.

New FPP Publications:

FPP has published two new publications; 'Oil Palm Expansion in South East Asia: Trends and implications for local communities and indigenous peoples' and 'Divers paths to justice: Legal pluralism and the rights of indigenous peoples in Southeast Asia'.

Nuevas publicaciones del FPP:

FPP ha publicado dos nuevas publicaciones: 'Oil Palm Expansion in South East Asia - Trends and implications for local communities and indigenous peoples (Expansión de la palma de aceite en el sudeste de Asia - Tendencias e implicaciones para las comunidades locales y los pueblos indígenas)' y 'Divers paths to justice: Legal pluralism and the rights of indigenous peoples in Southeast Asia (Diversas vías de acceso a la justicia): pluralismo jurídico y los derechos de los pueblos indígenas en el sudeste de Asia)'.

Updated Press Release: Bali Declaration acclaimed at Agribusiness and Human Rights in Southeast Asia Workshop

The international meeting of South East Asian Regional Human Rights Commissions on ‘Human Rights and Business: Plural Legal Approaches to Conflict Resolution, Institutional Strengthening and Legal Reform’ hosted by the Indonesian National Human Rights Commission (KOMNASHAM), in conjunction with Sawit Watch and Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) was held in Bali, Indonesia, from 28th November to 1st December 2011.

Press Release: Palm Oil Need Not Harm Environment or Local Communities, says New Study. 21 November 2011

Click here to Download the PDF Version of this Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The exponential growth in the palm oil sector, which accounts for a third of the total global trade of 130 million tons of vegetable oil annually, is strongly challenged by indigenous peoples and civil society organisations.  Indiscriminate land clearing and acquisition for oil palm plantations is resulting in rapid habitat loss, species extinctions and alarming greenhouse gas emissions. It has also led to the dispossession of both indigenous peoples and the rural poor who depend traditionally on forest habitats for their survival.

Oil Palm Expansion in South East Asia: Trends and implications for local communities and indigenous peoples

This insightful study by Forest Peoples Programme, SawitWatch, Samdhana Institute and the Center for People and Forests (RECOFTC) documents in detail, and for the first time, the way oil palm plantations are now expanding in very different ways across South East Asia as a whole. The study complements better known experiences in Malaysia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea with new case studies of the processes of oil palm expansion in Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam and the Philippines.