Resources

Indonesia: controversial pulp and paper giant APP comes under scrutiny as it plans expansion but makes new promises

Asia Pulp and Paper (APP) is coming under intensifying scrutiny over its renewed promises to bring its giant mills and supply chains into compliance with best practice norms for sustainability and its new promises that it will respect the rights of local communities and indigenous peoples. Recently, Marcus Colchester, as Co-Chair of the High Conservation Values Resource Network and Director of FPP, and Patrick Anderson, FPP's Policy Advisor in Indonesia, met with APP's Head of Sustainability, Aida Greenbury, and her team of advisers and consultants, to clarify the company's commitments.

Securing High Conservation Values in Central Kalimantan: Report of the Field Investigation in Central Kalimantan of the RSPO Ad Hoc Working Group on High Conservation Values in Indonesia

This report provides an account of a short investigation carried out by the RSPO's Ad Hoc Working Group on High Conservation Values in Indonesia. It is being circulated to promote comprehension and discussion about the legal and procedural obstacles to securing such values in the oil palm sector in Indonesia with the view to promoting changes and legal reforms in order to secure these values more effectively. This version includes detailed comments on the report by Wilmar International.

Cordaid partners' new publication - Biofuel Partnerships: from battleground to common ground? The effects of biofuel programs on smallholders' use of land and rights to land in four countries

This report includes a foreword by Marcus Colchester, Forest Peoples Programme, and focuses on the local experiences of smallholders, in different areas in four countries, related to the introduction of energy crop production and its effects on their land rights and land use. Click here to read the full report.

FPP E-Newsletter February 2012 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Balancing human beings’ need for decent livelihoods against the imperative of securing our environment is, arguably, the biggest challenge facing our planet. This struggle between ‘development’ and ‘conservation’ is being played out in global policy negotiations, with the decisions of so-called policy-makers being imposed on the ground. But not everything is or should be ‘top down’. Enduring solutions also spring from the grassroots, from the ‘bottom up’.

E-Boletín FPP Febrero 2012 (PDF Version)

Estimados amigos:

Se podría decir que equilibrar la necesidad que tiene el ser humano de medios de vida decentes con el imperativo de asegurar nuestro medio ambiente es el mayor reto que enfrenta nuestro planeta. Esta lucha entre el «desarrollo» y la «conservación» se está manteniendo en el campo de las negociaciones mundiales de políticas, con las decisiones de los denominados «encargados de la formulación de políticas» impuestas sobre el terreno. Pero no todo va o debería ir de «arriba abajo». También surgen soluciones duraderas en la base, de «abajo arriba».

E-Boletín FPP Febrero 2012 (PDF Version)

Estimados amigos:

Se podría decir que equilibrar la necesidad que tiene el ser humano de medios de vida decentes con el imperativo de asegurar nuestro medio ambiente es el mayor reto que enfrenta nuestro planeta. Esta lucha entre el «desarrollo» y la «conservación» se está manteniendo en el campo de las negociaciones mundiales de políticas, con las decisiones de los denominados «encargados de la formulación de políticas» impuestas sobre el terreno. Pero no todo va o debería ir de «arriba abajo». También surgen soluciones duraderas en la base, de «abajo arriba».

The Importance of Mainstreaming Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) in Tenurial Conflict Resolution in Indonesia

A summary of ADR studies in Riau, West Sumatra, Jambi and South Sumatra, Indonesia, by Ahmad Zazali, Executive Director, Scale Up

An ongoing and heated debate is underway over the neglect of public access rights over forest resources in current modes of forest tenure in Indonesia. The role of local communities and their access to natural resources often overlap with the rights accorded to government/state enterprises and the private sector. The exploitation of forest resources has driven large companies to ignore the interests of these communities who live within and depend on forests for their livelihoods. This situation in turn has triggered the emergence of intra- and inter-community social conflict, conflict between communities and the government, as well as conflict between communities and companies.

Since the reform and the implementation of decentralisation policies, natural resource conflicts have become increasingly prevalent in Indonesia. The National Land Agency (BPN) reports that at least 7,491 natural resource conflicts have been dealt with by BPN and the Indonesian police. The Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) recorded 359 forest-related conflicts from January 1997 to June 2003. The highest frequency of conflicts occurred in 2000 with 153 recorded cases, or 43% of the total number of cases recorded over those 6 years. Conflicts in ​​Industrial Plantation Forests (HTI) were the highest at 39%, with conservation areas (including protected forests and national parks) representing 34% of conflict cases, and forest concessions (HPH) representing 27%.

La importancia de fomentar la Resolución Alternativa de Conflictos (RAC) para resolver las disputas territoriales en Indonesia

Resumen de estudios de la resolución alternativa de conflictos en Riau, Sumatra Occidental, Jambi y Sumatra Meridional, Indonesia, Ahmad Zazali, director ejecutivo de Scale Up

Hace ya tiempo que en Indonesia mantienen un acalorado debate sobre la falta de atención a los derechos de acceso público a los recursos forestales en las actuales modalidades de tenencia de los bosques. El papel de las comunidades locales y su acceso a los recursos naturales suele solaparse con los derechos concedidos a empresas del gobierno (estatales) y del sector privado. Hay grandes empresas que a la hora de explotar los recursos forestales han hecho caso omiso de los intereses de las comunidades que viven en los bosques y dependen de ellos para su subsistencia. Esta situación a su vez ha provocado conflictos sociales entre comunidades y dentro de una misma comunidad, entre las comunidades y el gobierno, y entre las comunidades y las empresas.

Los conflictos en torno a los recursos naturales se han hecho cada vez más  frecuentes en Indonesia, desde la reforma y la aplicación de políticas de descentralización. Según informa la Agencia Nacional para la Tierra (BPN por sus siglas en indonesio), entre ella y la policía indonesia han atendido al menos 7491 conflictos relacionados con los recursos naturales. El Centro para la Investigación Forestal Internacional (CIFOR) registró 359 conflictos relacionados con los bosques entre enero de 1997 y junio de 2003. La mayor frecuencia de conflictos corresponde al año 2000, en que se registraron 153 casos, el 43% del total de casos registrados en esos 6 años. El porcentaje más alto, un 39%, corresponde a conflictos en bosques con plantaciones industriales, un 34% a conflictos en zonas de conservación (incluyendo bosques protegidos y parques nacionales), y un 27% a conflictos en concesiones forestales.