Resources

Urgent action needed to halt the takeover of indigenous peoples’ lands for megaprojects in Indonesia

Urgent action is needed to halt the takeover of indigenous peoples’ lands for megaprojects in forested provinces like Kalimantan and Papua in Indonesia. The destruction of forests and rivers is undermining local indigenous livelihoods, and destroying ancestral lands. Between 40 and 70 million people in rural Indonesia depend on access to lands and resources, including water for drinking and sanitation, protected by customary laws.

The Maninjau Resolution

The Maninjau Resolution

28th January 2016

Wilmar’s broken promises: we want action not just pledges

The world’s largest palm oil trading company, Wilmar International Ltd. (F34.SI / WLIL.SI), promised ‘Zero Exploitation’ throughout its supply chain alongside its commitment to ‘Zero Deforestation’. As human rights workers and NGOs that support the rights of the indigenous peoples and local communities in Indonesia and internationally, we NGOs who assembled here near Lake Maninjau in West Sumatra on 26-28 January 2016, declare the following.

Resolusi Maninjau

Resolusi Maninjau28 Januari 2016

Wilmar, “Kami butuh tindakan bukan ikrar”

Perusahaan perdagangan minyak sawit terbesar dunia, Wilmar International Ltd. (F34.SI / WLIL.SI), berikrar untuk menjalankan kebijakan ‘Nol Eksploitasi’ atau ‘Zero Exploitation’ di seluruh rantai pasoknya seiring dengan komitmennya untuk ‘Nol Deforestasi’. Sebagai NGO dan pegiat Hak Asasi Manusia (HAM) yang mendukung hak-hak masyarakat adat dan komunitas lokal -baik di Indonesia maupun di dunia, kami, sejumlah NGO dan masyarakat yang berkumpul di lereng bukit tepi Danau Maninjau, Sumatra Barat, 26-28 Januari 2016, menyampaikan pernyataan-pernyataan berikut:

Bloomberg: One Word May Save Indonesia’s Forests

Source: Bloomberg

Indonesia’s forest and peatland fires have flared up again this season, sending smoke and haze from the island of Sumatra north across the Malacca Strait to Malaysia. The fires are now an annual consequence of the mismanagement of Indonesia’s forests. With the removal of a single word from the country’s constitution, however, that may change for the better.

Presiden Indonesia berkomitmen untuk mengakui hak-hak kolektif masyarakat adat atas wilayah mereka

Dalam sebuah pernyataan penting kepada sebuah pertemuan internasional yang dihadiri sebagian pembeli terbesar minyak sawit dan kertas-bubur kertas Indonesia, Presiden Indonesia Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono mengumumkan langkah-langkah baru untuk menahan laju deforestasi. Seraya menerima tanggung jawab atas kabut asap yang lebih buruk dari biasanya akibat pembakaran hutan di perkebunan di Sumatra, yang telah mengganggu kehidupan masyarakat Singapura dan Malaysia (termasuk masyarakat Sumatra sendiri), Presiden mengaitkan perlunya pengawasan yang lebih kuat terhadap hutan dengan perlunya menjamin hak-hak masyarakat yang tergantung pada hutan dan hak-hak masyarakat adat. 

Constitutional Court ruling restores indigenous peoples' rights to their customary forests in Indonesia

In what may well prove to be a historic judgment for Indonesia's indigenous peoples, the Constitutional Court in Jakarta ruled today that the customary forests of indigenous peoples should not be classed as falling in 'State Forest Areas', paving the way for a wider recognition of indigenous peoples' rights in the archipelago. The judgment was made in response to a petition filed with the court by the national indigenous peoples' organisation AMAN (Aliansi Masyarakat Adat Nusantara) some 14 months ago. AMAN had objected to the way the 1999 Forestry Act treats indigenous peoples' 'customary forests'  as providing only weak use-rights within State Forest Areas. The judgment now opens the way for a major reallocation of forests back to the indigenous peoples who have long occupied them and looked after them. The Government's own statistics revealed last year that there are some 32,000 villages whose lands overlap areas classed as 'State Forest Areas'.

Rural Indonesians Demonstrate to Demand Land Rights and an End to Land Grabs

Following high profile cases of police violence and killings of rural people protesting land grabs, a new alliance of rural people - indigenous peoples, farmers, workers and landless people as well as supportive NGOs - is demanding the repeal of laws which allow the State to expropriate people's lands and resources in favour or large businesses. They are also demanding the passing of new laws that secure the people's rights in land and ensure ecological justice, through agrarian reforms and the recognition of indigenous peoples' rights.

Ensuring respect for ‘Free, Prior and Informed Consent’ in Indonesia

Working closely with partners in Indonesia, Forest Peoples Programme helped convene a global meeting of The Forests Dialogue about how to make sure that the right to ‘Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC)’ is respected in Indonesia. The four day field dialogue held in Riau Province on the island of Sumatra in Indonesia, in October 2010, brought together over 80 participants from a great variety of backgrounds including indigenous peoples, representatives of local communities, non-governmental organisations, international financial institutions, government agencies and the private sector. The meeting was the first in a planned series of field dialogues which have the main aim of exploring how in practice government agencies, commercial enterprises and non-government organizations should respect the right of indigenous peoples and local communities to give or withhold their free, prior and informed consent, as expressed through their own freely chosen representative organisations, to activities that may affect their rights.

REDD+ discussions unfurl after Copenhagen

There are growing concerns about the poor consultation and engagement of indigenous peoples in discussions on major forest and climate initiatives and the potential risks for their rights. This March, indigenous people were excluded from a meeting in Paris to launch a French-Norwegian initiative on REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation - Plus); concerns have been voiced by Guyanese indigenous peoples with reference to the ongoing REDD+-Low Carbon Development (LCD) strategy process in their country; and the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) has been elaborating on their Strategic Environmental and Social Assessment (SESA) framework without clarifying how World Bank safeguards will be implemented.

Indonesian government requested by CERD to safeguard indigenous communities' property rights in REDD procedures

In response to an urgent action request from Aliansi Masyarakat Adat Nusantara (AMAN), Sawit Watch, FPP and others, the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) has urged Indonesia to guarantee effective protection of indigenous peoples' rights while implementing reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD).

Read the response from CERD Read the NGOs' urgent action request