Resources

The way ahead from Paris COP21: risks and opportunities for indigenous peoples

The final UN climate summit outcomes in Paris were weak on rights, but open the way to greater recognition of indigenous peoples’ traditional knowledge in climate policies and actions in the post 2020 climate regime.

Securing Indigenous Peoples’ rights to land and effective compliance with the FPIC standard will be key to ensure legality and sustainability in the implementation of climate programmes and  financing.  

Jalan ke depan dari COP21 di Paris, risiko dan peluang bagi masyarakat adat

Hasil akhir dari KTT iklim PBB di Paris lemah mengenai hak, tapi membuka jalan untuk pengakuan yang lebih besar dari pengetahuan tradisional masyarakat adat dalam kebijakan dan aksi iklim dalam rezim iklim pasca 2020.

Mengamankan hak-hak masyarakat adat atas tanah dan kepatuhan yang efektif terhadap standar FPIC akan menjadi kunci untuk menjamin legalitas dan keberlanjutan dalam pelaksanaan program-program dan pembiayaan iklim.

The Green Climate Fund and FPIC - A call for the adoption of an indigenous peoples' policy: The lessons from a wetland project in Peru

Under considerable expectations and pressure to deliver shortly before the beginning of the UNFCCC 21st Conference of the Parties to be held in Paris, the Board of the Green Climate Fund  (GCF) considered the first projects for funding at its meeting in Zambia in early November, 2015.  One project presented to the GCF by Peruvian Implementing Entity (IE) PROFONANPE contains a proposal for wetland management with the participation of indigenous peoples in the province of Loreto in the eastern Amazon region.

The Situation of Indigenous Peoples in Paraguay: Their lands and the Laws that Would Protect Them

On 12 November 2015, Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) and its partner in Paraguay, the Federación por la Autodeterminación de los Pueblos Indígenas (FAPI) released a companion set of reports describing the current situation of indigenous people, their lands, resources, and territories in Paraguay, along with the national legal framework that is meant to respect, promote and protect their rights.  Many have argued that the last big “land grab” with respect to indigenous lands, resources and territories will not be from large infrastructure projects, but from conservation and resource protection initiatives.

Situasi masyarakat adat di Paraguay: Tanah mereka dan Undang-Undang yang Akan Melindungi Mereka

Pada tanggal 12 November 2015, Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) dan mitranya di Paraguay, yaitu Federación por la Autodeterminación de los Pueblos Indígenas (FAPI) merilis satu set laporan pendamping yang menggambarkan situasi saat ini dari masyarakat adat, serta tanah, sumberdaya, dan wilayah mereka di Paraguay, bersama dengan kerangka hukum nasional yang ditujukan untuk menghormati, mempromosikan dan melindungi hak-hak mereka. Banyak yang berpendapat bahwa "perampasan tanah" yang besar yang terjadi akhir-akhir ini sehubungan dengan tanah, sumberdaya dan wilayah adat tidak akan datang dari proyek-proyek infrastruktur besar, tapi dari inisiatif konservasi dan perlindungan sumberdaya.

New Analysis Reveals that Indigenous Lands Hold More than 20% of World’s Tropical Forest Carbon

New analysis of forests in indigenous territories shows recognizing, protecting rights of traditional peoples can make major contribution to slowing climate change and would support nat'l commitments to reduce climate impacts

An analysis released at the UN climate conference (known as COP 21) maps and quantifies, for the first time, the carbon stored in indigenous territories across the world’s largest expanses of remaining tropical forest.

IPO Letter to GCF Board

Indigenous Peoples' organisations raise concerns regarding the use of the terms “country ownership” and “multi-stakeholder engagement" ahead of Green Climate Fund meetings in Zambia, 2015. The letter is significant as it is the first official and widely supported position on the GCF expressed by Indigenous Peoples.

Read the full letter here

Civil society submission to the Green Climate Fund on accreditation and safeguard standards

The Green Climate Fund is developing a set of environmental and social safeguard standards and an associated accreditation process to enable agencies, organisations or governments to access they funds it will make available for climate change mitigation and adaption activities. Key concerns shared by civil society and indigenous peoples have been brought to the attention of the Board of the GCF and of the expert group tasked with developing these standards.

New Publication: Indigenous Peoples and the Green Climate Fund – A technical briefing for Indigenous Peoples, policymakers and support groups

On the occasion of the first Board meeting of the Green Climate Fund (GCF), Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) and Jaringan Orang Asal Se-Malaysia (JOAS) are publishing a report titled: “Indigenous Peoples and the Green Climate Fund – A technical briefing for Indigenous Peoples, policymakers and support groups”.

Read the report in English or in Spanish

This report summarises some key issues relevant for indigenous peoples, building on statements and policy platforms adopted by Indigenous Peoples’ Caucuses. In particular the report draws attention to the need for the GCF to improve indigenous peoples’ participation in governance, adopt stronger safeguards and facilitate direct access to financing for climate change response actions developed and implemented by indigenous peoples.

9th RRI Dialogue on Forests, Governance and Climate Change, London, February 2011

The 9th RRI Dialogue on Forests, Governance and Climate Change, co-organized with Forest Peoples Programme, Tebtebba and Forest Trends, took place in London, UK on 8 February 2011. The Dialogue drew together a number of key actors involved in REDD, including representatives from Indigenous Peoples organizations, governments of UK Mexico and Norway, the banking sector, NGOs and researchers.

The consensus emerging from the discussion was that REDD should not proceed before clear safeguards are put in place. Gregory Barker, British minister of State, Department for Energy and Climate Change outlined that before REDD projects take place, it is crucial to assess drivers of deforestation, secure clarity of land tenure and ensure equitable benefit-sharing for Indigenous Peoples. To that end, he assured that the UK government will apply safeguards in bilateral REDD agreements with Indigenous Peoples and local communities. Despite this commitment he avoided mentioning whether the UK would push for stronger safeguards in the readiness processes of the World Bank’s FCPF initiative.