Resources

FPP E-Newsletter February 2014 (PDF Version)

Dear friends,

The UN General Assembly during its 69th session, on 22-23 September  this year, will convene a high-level plenary meeting - the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples  – to review the implementation of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) since its adoption in 2007, and to identify outstanding issues and actions pertaining to indigenous peoples and development.

Legality without justice? How to ensure that FLEGT Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) achieve both

This article seeks to touch base with the policy objectives of the European Union (EU)’s 2003 Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (‘FLEGT’) Action Plan, and highlight lessons learnt during Forest Peoples Programme’s EU-funded Strong Seat at the Table project.[1] With partners Centre pour l'Environnement et le Développement (Centre for the Environment and for Development, CED), FERN and ClientEarth, the ‘Strong Seat’ project supported the legal capacity of civil society partners engaged in VPA-related legal reforms in West and Central Africa.

Publication launch: 'Securing land and resource rights in Africa: a guide to legal reform and best practice'

Please join FERN, Forest Peoples Programme, ClientEarth and the Centre for the Environment and for Development (CED) for a short presentation on the findings of "a strong seat at the table", an EU funded project to strengthen land tenure rights in Africa. It will include the launch of a new guide on securing land tenure reform in Africa titled "Securing land and resource rights in Africa: a guide to legal reform and best practice" and will be followed by Forest Drinks.

New publication by CED: A Simplified Guide to Forest Monitoring for Local Communities

The Centre for the Environment and for Development (CED) has published a new guide on forest monitoring for use by local communities. The aim of the guide is to inform and raise awareness of the benefits of forest monitoring by communities, and to present the main methods and necesssary tools to ensure good forest governance. It is intended to provide local forest communities with the necessary skills and tools to effectively identify and denounce activities of illegal forest exploitation taking place around them.

Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads

Click here to read related PRESS RELEASE.

Read this report in English or in Bahasa Indonesia

Growing global demand for palm oil is fuelling the large-scale expansion of oil palm plantations across Southeast Asia and Africa. Concerns about the environmental and social impacts of the conversion of vast tracts of land to monocrop plantations led in 2004 to the establishment of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), which encourages oil palm expansion in ways that do not destroy high conservation values or cause social conflict. Numerous international agencies have also called for reforms of national frameworks to secure communities’ rights and to develop sound land governance.

As experiências de povos indígenas da África com as políticas de salvaguarda: Exemplos do Camarões e da Bacia do Congo

A noção de indígena é geralmente algo polêmico na África. Existem opiniões que consideram todos os africanos como indígenas liberados dos poderes coloniais, enquanto outras simplesmente destacam que é muito difícil determinar quem é indígena na África. A criação, em 2001, do Grupo de Trabalho sobre as Populações/Comunidades Indígenas da Comissão Africana dos Direitos Humanos e dos Povos (ACHPR na sigla em inglês) e o relatório do Grupo, enviado à Comissão e aprovado em 2003, trouxeram uma nova perspectiva à esta questão. Nesse relatório, pela primeira vez, houve uma aceitação unânime da existência de povos indígenas na África, o que levou ao debate de como os países poderiam começar a integrar os direitos desses povos na esfera de direitos humanos. A maioria dos povos indígenas da África Central são povos caçadores-coletores, comumente conhecidos como “Pigmeus”, e povos pastores. Estes povos ainda sofrem discriminação por meio da desapropriação das suas terras e a destruição dos seus meios de vida, culturas e identidades, extrema pobreza, falta de acesso e participação nas decisões políticas e falta de acesso à educação e centros de saúde.

FPP E-Newsletter Special Edition on Safeguards, April 2013 (PDF Version)

As multiple international agencies adopt and update their social and environmental policies, this special edition Forest Peoples Programme E-Newsletter reviews experiences of communities and civil society with the safeguard policies of various international financial institutions. 

The Ngoyla-Mintom forest in Cameroon: The perspective of the Baka

Ngoyla-Mintom is a forested mountainous region which derives its name from two districts in two regions of Cameroon: Ngoyla in the Eastern Region and Mintom in the Southern Region. This rainforest has gained fame through being targeted for various purposes by different actors, including the Cameroon government, private companies and the international community. In recent months, Ngoyla-Mintom has gained the reputation of being a previously unexploited forest bloc, which has very rapidly aroused the interest of Cameroon’s Ministry of Forestry who are interested in selling parts of the forest at auction to private logging companies.

FPP E-Newsletter February 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Whenever someone remarks that a solution is being frustrated by ‘lack of political will’, I automatically ask myself: whose is the political will and what are the interests pushing for the opposite? 

Request for Consideration of the implications for the Indigenous Forest Peoples of Cameroon from the imminent adoption of a racially discriminatory new Forest Law, under the UN CERD's Urgent Action and Early Warning Procedures

The purpose of this request is to bring to the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (UN CERD)'s attention the imminent enactment of a new Forest Law in Cameroon. The submitting organisations (Okani, CED and Forest Peoples Programme) highlight that both the process of reform and the contents of the proposed new law are racially discriminatory towards indigenous peoples.