Resources

It’s forest that we can live from, not oil palm

Jakarta – A civil society coalition took action outside the Environment and Forestry Ministry on Friday (23/03/2018), protesting a permit to release state forest land near the Wosimi River in Naikere and Kuriwamesa subdistricts of Wondama Bay Regency, Papua Barat which was issued to an oil palm company, PT Menara Wasior.

UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination adopts NGO submissions on human rights in Papua

Following the submission of inputs on the human rights situation in Indonesia and Papua by indigenous peoples' organisations for the UN Universal Periodic Review in September 2016, the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) has considered, under its early warning and urgent action procedure, allegations of excessive use of force, arrests, killings and torture of persons belonging to the Papuan indigenous people in West Papua, Indonesia

Papua New Guinea indigenous chiefs from Collingwood Bay reject Malaysian oil palm plantation and complain to RSPO

The traditional chiefs of Collingwood Bay in Papua New Guinea's Northern Province have filed a complaint with the RSPO accusing the Malaysian Company, Kuala Lumpur Kepong, of acting contrary to the RSPO Code of Conduct, Certification Systems and Principles and Criteria. In their detailed submission to the RSPO, they note that they have actively opposed oil palm developments on their lands since 2010.

UN human rights bodies take note of massive land speculation in Papua New Guinea

Lands held and managed under custom in Papua New Guinea (PNG) are regularly quoted as covering the vast majority of the country’s land mass, 97% is the usually accepted figure. The remaining 3% of lands, no longer governed by tradition and custom, are referred to as ‘alienated lands’ and come under the management of the Department of Lands and Physical Planning.  However these remarkable figures of land tenure security hide a grimmer truth. Over the past 13 months alone almost 10% of the land mass of Papua New Guinea has been issued out as concessions under an arrangement known as ‘Special Agricultural and Business Leases’ (SABL). Under these lease agreements, the government leases customary lands from traditional owners and re-leases the same lands, often to a third party, with customary rights to the lands suspended for the term of the lease.