Resources

Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads

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Read this report in English or in Bahasa Indonesia

Growing global demand for palm oil is fuelling the large-scale expansion of oil palm plantations across Southeast Asia and Africa. Concerns about the environmental and social impacts of the conversion of vast tracts of land to monocrop plantations led in 2004 to the establishment of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), which encourages oil palm expansion in ways that do not destroy high conservation values or cause social conflict. Numerous international agencies have also called for reforms of national frameworks to secure communities’ rights and to develop sound land governance.

New briefing: Free, Prior and Informed Consent and the RSPO; Are the companies keeping their promises? Findings and recommendations from Southeast Asia and Africa

This briefing, launched on the occasion of the 10th Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RT10), draws together the key findings of fourteen studies on FPIC in RSPO member/certified plantations based on the RSPO Principles & Criteria (P&C) and related Indicators and Guidance, and makes recommendations for reforms in the way palm oil companies honour the principle of FPIC and respect customary rights to land.

First Board meeting of the Green Climate Fund takes place

The Green Climate Fund, the body tasked to deliver climate funds under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has met for the first time. Indigenous Peoples challenged rules of participation and engagement and called for the recognition of indigenous peoples’ rights.

New FPP Publications

Forest Peoples Programme (alongside partner organisations) has published three new publications; ‘Indigenous Peoples and the Green Climate Fund – A technical briefing for Indigenous Peoples, policymakers and support groups’, the third edition of ‘What is REDD+? A guide for indigenous communities’ and the second edition of ‘A Guide to Indigenous Women’s Rights under the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women’.

New Publication: Indigenous Peoples and the Green Climate Fund – A technical briefing for Indigenous Peoples, policymakers and support groups

On the occasion of the first Board meeting of the Green Climate Fund (GCF), Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) and Jaringan Orang Asal Se-Malaysia (JOAS) are publishing a report titled: “Indigenous Peoples and the Green Climate Fund – A technical briefing for Indigenous Peoples, policymakers and support groups”.

Read the report in English or in Spanish

This report summarises some key issues relevant for indigenous peoples, building on statements and policy platforms adopted by Indigenous Peoples’ Caucuses. In particular the report draws attention to the need for the GCF to improve indigenous peoples’ participation in governance, adopt stronger safeguards and facilitate direct access to financing for climate change response actions developed and implemented by indigenous peoples.

Indigenous Peoples and support organisations' comments and recommendations on the modalities for selection, activities and role of observers and active observers in the Board of the Green Climate Fund

In response to a specific request by the Green Climate Fund Secretariat, Indigenous Peoples and support organisations have submitted their comments and recommendations on the modalities for selection, activities and role of observers and active observers in the Board of the Green Climate Fund - See Letter. Specific operational details are provided in the response to the questionnaire (attached).

REDD+ systems on providing information on safeguards (SIS): Inclusion of data relevant for indigenous peoples

Developing countries’ remaining forests are spaces inhabited by indigenous peoples. These spaces have been shaped, protected and expanded by indigenous peoples over generations. The relationship of indigenous peoples to forests is linked to livelihoods, cultures, world views and traditional knowledge and may be expressed through forms of customary tenure, land use and resource use. By proposing social and rights-based indicators and building blocks, this document promotes a view of REDD+ that is holistic and secures carbon stocks, biodiversity and the rights of forest peoples.

Global Climate Talks: Business as Usual or Progress on Social and Rights Issues?

•    Low likelihood that Durban will deliver a binding and comprehensive agreement on GHG reductions •    No agreement on long-term climate financing while Green Climate Fund talks proceed with difficulty •    Limited progress on a Safeguards Information System in REDD+ •    UNFCCC considers non-carbon values of REDD+ •    Indigenous Peoples adopt “Oaxaca Action Plan” on climate

Governments gathering in Durban in late November for COP17 of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) face a daunting task. They will have to make progress on crafting an agreement on greenhouse gas emissions reductions within an effective, monitorable and binding legal framework, while securing the necessary financial resources needed to support developing countries on their path towards low carbon development. The survival of the Kyoto protocol is at stake. Some countries will not support the second commitment period: the United States is advocating for a “pledge and review” system, while other countries propose a broader instrument that would engage both developed and developing countries.