Resources

Conserving injustice: The unnecessary ongoing eviction and displacement of Sengwer communities in Embobut

The Sengwer community at Embobut has been dispersed, with most still living in their forests and glades high in the Cherangany Hills despite the evictions by the Government’s Kenya Forest Service (KFS). There they hide from the forest guards’ harassment, from having their now makeshift and temporary homes burnt and basic household property destroyed, as well as from being threatened with arrest despite the existence of a High Court injunction forbidding such harassment and evictions.

Forest Peoples Programme Dialogue on Community-based Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV)

From 16-19 Nov. 2015, FPP in collaboration with its local partners working across the Africa region organized in Yaoundé in Cameroon a meeting on Monitoring Reporting and Verification (MRV). The objective of this MRV meeting was to develop a common approach to community-based monitoring and set out appropriate indicators and tools for MRV that FPP and partners can mainstream throughout various initiatives on the ground to secure the rights of forest communities.

Community-based monitoring and information systems (CBMIS) in the context of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD)

Community-based monitoring and information systems (CBMIS) refer to initiatives by indigenous peoples and local community organisations to monitor their community’s well-being and the state of their territories and natural resources, applying a mix of traditional knowledge and innovative tools and approaches. A newly emerging CBMIS network of indigenous peoples and local communities is now active in pilot communities in at least a dozen countries, with monitoring activities on the health of biodiversity, climate change impacts, effects of unsustainable/illegal activities and also implementation of international agreements such as the CBD at the national or local level.

Where They Stand

Where They Stand details how Wapichan people in South America use modern technologies in the struggle to secure their land rights

The Wapichan people of Guyana are using modern technology and community research to seek legal recognition of their ancestral land in the face of aggressive land-grabbing, destructive logging, and poisonous mining by illegal miners and foreign companies, finds new report by internationally acclaimed science writer Fred Pearce.

The ‘Zero Deforestation’ debate: Forest Peoples, ‘High Conservation Values’ and ‘High Carbon Stocks’

Global calls to curb forest loss have taken on an added urgency in the light of renewed efforts to combat climate change. The statistics are clear: rapid land use change is a significant cause of emissions of global warming gases. In some tropical forest counties, like Indonesia, land clearance for oil palm and pulpwood plantations is causing massive emissions from trashed forests and drained peat-swamps. Per capita emissions from Indonesia rival those of many developed countries. So it makes sense to slow down forest loss.

How are Indigenous Communities Benefiting from GPS Data Loggers?

What are GPS data loggers and how do they work?

A GPS data logger is an electronic device that records data over time or in relation to location. Generally they are small, battery powered, portable, and equipped with a microprocessor, internal memory for data storage and sensors.

Forthcoming Publication: Where They Stand

They are bound to that land, and they are its true custodians.”

Written by author and journalist Fred Pearce, Where They Stand reveals the reality of life for the Wapichan people. With detailed observations, Pearce documents their determined efforts to secure effective recognition of their customary land rights covering extensive rainforests in the Upper Essequibo basin and savannah grasslands, dry tropical forests and montane forest in the South Rupununi District of Guyana.

Event Report: "The Global Indigenous Movement: Past Achievements, Future Challenges"

On 26th March 2015, The Social Movements and Civil Society Research Group at City University London (SMCSRG) held its third evening event, a talk on The Global Indigenous Movement: Past Achievements Future Challenges. SMCSRG was delighted to host long-time indigenous peoples’ rights activist and current Director of the Forest Peoples Programme, Joji Cariño, to speak on these themes. The event was Chaired by Dr Mauro Barelli, a Senior Lecturer specialising in minority and indigenous peoples’ rights at The City Law School.

Whakatane Mechanism launched at the WPC in Sydney, November 2014

The previous IUCN World Parks Congress (WPC) was held in Durban, South Africa in 2003. The historic marginalisation of indigenous peoples and local communities from conservation movements and policies resulted in a difficult push for the recognition of local communities’ rights, indigenous peoples’ contribution to conservation and the need for rights-based conservation approaches. Indigenous peoples and local communities were outside the system pushing to get in. However their efforts were successful and helped lead to the recognition of the “new conservation paradigm”.

Including Indigenous and Local Knowledge in the IPBES

The Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) informs policy and decision-making on biodiversity and ecosystem services. (It is an equivalent of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) under the Climate Change Convention.)  However, IPBES goes beyond just conventional scientific knowledge. IPBES recognises indigenous and local knowledge (and diverse knowledge systems) in its conceptual framework and work programme.