Resources

Forest Peoples Programme Dialogue on Community-based Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV)

From 16-19 Nov. 2015, FPP in collaboration with its local partners working across the Africa region organized in Yaoundé in Cameroon a meeting on Monitoring Reporting and Verification (MRV). The objective of this MRV meeting was to develop a common approach to community-based monitoring and set out appropriate indicators and tools for MRV that FPP and partners can mainstream throughout various initiatives on the ground to secure the rights of forest communities.

Congo Basin communities and NGOs mobilise in response to growing palm oil threat in the region

Civil Society Organizations (CSOs), local communities, and Indigenous people groups in the Congo Basin have convened to address the emerging challenges of palm oil development in the region. Hosted by the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) in Douala, Cameroon, meetings were held from December 2-4, 2014 attended by nearly 40 civil society experts and community leaders from over 25 organizations. Insightful presentations were made, and strategic reflections and discussions took place in order to address communities' challenges related to palm oil expansion in the region.

FPP E-Newsletter Special Edition on Safeguards, April 2013 (PDF Version)

As multiple international agencies adopt and update their social and environmental policies, this special edition Forest Peoples Programme E-Newsletter reviews experiences of communities and civil society with the safeguard policies of various international financial institutions. 

Report by CEFAID questions the validity of the consultations in Cameroon for the World Heritage Site nomination of the Tri-National de la Sangha (TNS) protected area

The Tri-National de la Sangha (TNS) is a protected area with a landscape approach spanning three countries: Cameroon, Central African Republic (CAR) and the Republic of Congo. In 2010, the three countries jointly nominated the area as a UNESCO World Heritage site. This nomination was considered by the World Heritage Committee in June 2011.

FPP Field Report Central African Republic/Dzanga Reserve, February/March 2011

IntroductionForest Peoples Programme staff have recently returned from two weeks in the Central African Republic where we were working with the Bayaka Community Union and the World Wildlife Fund in the context of the EU-funded, Government of Central Africa Republic-implemented, and WWF-supported Dzanga Sangha project in which FPP is a partner. The objective of the EU project is to promote and improve local and especially indigenous livelihoods and sustainable development in the Dzanga Special Reserve in the context of increased protection for community rights, along with improved access to health and education services. The project is especially targeting the indigenous population of Bayaka forest huntergatherer communities, and the Sangha Sangha people, now a minority group traditionally based predominately along the rivers of the region. This EU project is one of a number of donor-funded projects implemented by the government, with technical and financial support from WWF, which together enable the Dzanga- Sangha Special Reserve to operate.

FPP series on Forest Peoples and Protected Areas

This series of eight country studies and a synthesis report review the progress of the application of indigenous peoples' rights with regards to protected areas since 2003. By considering the views of governments, funding agencies, conservation organisations and indigenous peoples' organisations, these studies assesses the extend to which recommendations and resolutions from the Durban 2003 World Parks Congress, the 4th World Conservation Congress in Barcelona and the Convention on Biological Diversity have been followed up on and enacted.

The Health Situation of Women and Children in Central African Pygmy Peoples - May 2006

We are completely neglected and forgotten. Even our wives do not have access to midwives. They are permanently exposed to death because of lack of care during their pregnancy and deliveries. This came with the so-called modern life into which we were dragged. It did not exist when we were living in our natural environment. We had so many plants for such problems... Twa man from Kalehe district, Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)[2]