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Press Release: Wapichan people in Guyana showcase community proposal to save tropical forests on their traditional lands

PRESS INFORMATION

Georgetown, 7 February: The indigenous Wapichan people of Guyana, South America, will make public today a locally-made digital map of their traditional territory alongside a ground-breaking community proposal to care for 1.4 million ha of pristine rainforest for the benefit of their communities and the world. The territory’s rich variety of rainforests, mountains, wetlands, savannah grasslands and tropical woodlands are the homeland of 20 communities, who make a living from small-scale farming, hunting, fishing and gathering, which they have practised over the whole area for generations. The same area, located in the South Rupununi District, south-west Guyana, has an outstanding abundance of wildlife, including endangered species such as giant river otters, jaguars, and rare bush dogs as well as endemic species of fish and birds, like the Rio Branco Antbird.

The grassroots proposal comes at a crucial time because the entire Wapichan territory in Guyana, like many other parts of the Amazon basin and Guiana Shield, is threatened by mega road and dam projects as well as external plans for logging, mining and agribusiness development. In common with many indigenous peoples across Guyana and South America, the communities are vulnerable to land grabs and marginalisation because they lack secure legal title over much of their traditional lands.

Wa Wiizi - Wa Kaduzu. Our territory - Our Custom. Customary Use of Biological Resources and Related Traditional Practices within Wapichan Territory in Guyana: an indigenous case study - Guyana 10(c) Case Study

Wa Wiizi - Wa Kaduzu   Our territory - Our Custom Customary Use of Biological Resources and Related Traditional Practices within Wapichan Territory in Guyana - an indigenous case study

This study summarises how the Wapichan people in Guyana customarily use biological resources within their traditional territory in the South Rupununi, and explores the opportunities and challenges relating to effective implementation of article 10(c) of the CBD at the local and national level.