Resources

Challenges and opportunities in the adoption of community forestry in RoC

In the absence of a land tenure system establishing clear collective ownership rights, community forestry now appears to be the most efficient option to secure customary land tenure in Congo. However, despite the opportunities that community forestry offers for IPLCs to secure customary land rights and improve their livelihoods, a number or constraints and challenges persist in relation to land tenure insecurity and overlapping.

Our Land, Our Life - A Participatory Assessment of Land Tenure

In Guyana, communities are suffering because they do not have title to the full extent of their traditional lands, or have no title at all. This report seeks to present a detailed picture of the current status of land rights for communities in the Potaro-Siparuni region (Region 8) in west-central Guyana.

Status and Trends in Traditional Occupations

FPP has produced a new report presenting the outcomes of preliminary research on the practice of traditional occupations in indigenous and local communities. While the rapid assessment only provides sample insights (from 17 experts in 13 countries), it brings together unique and diverse stories, experiences and views on these occupations from a ground-level perspective.

Community-based monitoring and information systems (CBMIS) in the context of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD)

Community-based monitoring and information systems (CBMIS) refer to initiatives by indigenous peoples and local community organisations to monitor their community’s well-being and the state of their territories and natural resources, applying a mix of traditional knowledge and innovative tools and approaches. A newly emerging CBMIS network of indigenous peoples and local communities is now active in pilot communities in at least a dozen countries, with monitoring activities on the health of biodiversity, climate change impacts, effects of unsustainable/illegal activities and also implementation of international agreements such as the CBD at the national or local level.

Where They Stand

Where They Stand details how Wapichan people in South America use modern technologies in the struggle to secure their land rights

The Wapichan people of Guyana are using modern technology and community research to seek legal recognition of their ancestral land in the face of aggressive land-grabbing, destructive logging, and poisonous mining by illegal miners and foreign companies, finds new report by internationally acclaimed science writer Fred Pearce.

FPP E-Newsletter July 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Mutual recognition, mutual respect and mutual benefit are among the desirable attributes of all human relationships. Indigenous peoples and other forest peoples also expect these qualities in their relationships with others – be they governments, private corporations, NGOs or other indigenous peoples’ organisations and communities. This issue of Forest Peoples Programme’s E-Newsletter reports on the state of various relationships between forest peoples and different institutions – as these are forged, tested or broken –in the course of assertions for upholding basic human rights, social justice and solidarity.

Synthesis Paper - 10(c) Case Studies

Synthesis Paper - Customary sustainable use of biodiversity by indigenous peoples and local communities: Examples, challenges, community initiatives and recommendations relating to CBD Article 10(c)

A Synthesis Paper based on Case Studies from Bangladesh, Cameroon, Guyana, Suriname, Venezuela, Suriname and Thailand.

Maraka

Deze nieuwsbrief is een uitgave van de Vereniging van Inheemse Dorpshoofden in Suriname (VIDS).(Newsletter of the Association of Indigenous Village Leaders in Suriname - available in Dutch only)

Resuscitating the Sundarbans: Customary use of biodiversity & traditional cultural practices in Bangladesh - 10(c) Case Study

This report highlights the connection between biodiversity conservation and forest peoples' livelihoods and customary use. It shows how the current Forest Department-led management continues to threaten the long-term survival of the forest and the people. The traditional resource users call for an urgent shift towards community-based and collaborative management of the Sundarbans to ensure a future both for its biodiversity and its people.

Deserting the Sundarbans: Local peoples' perspective on ADB-GEF-Netherlands funded Sundarbans biodiversity conservation project

The US$77.3m Sundarbans Biodiversity Conservation Project was suspended three years early because of its failure to conserve biological diversity and reduce poverty in the Sundarbans. This report provides an analysis of the project's design flaws and consequent disintegration, and identifies means of making good the damage done.

HARD COPY ONLY - AVAILABLE FROM THE FPP OFFICE: info@forestpeoples.org

47 pages   Unnayan Onneshan, Nijera kori, FPP