Resources

Securing Forest Peoples’ Rights and Tackling Deforestation in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Deforestation and forest degradation have increased in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), despite the government’s commitment to safeguard its forests.

Illegal logging, unsustainable mining, commercial agriculture, and urban demand for fuelwood represent only some of the major long-term threats to the forests. By contrast, the traditional livelihood strategies of indigenous and local communities show a capacity to coexist with forests sustainably.

The rights of Baka communities in the REDD+ Ngoyla-Mintom project in Cameroon

Of the indigenous hunter gatherer peoples of Cameroon (the peoples who self-identify as ‘autochthonous’), the Baka are the largest group, numbering about 40,000 and living in an area of 75,000 km2 in the south-west of the country; the Bagyeli/Bokola are the second-largest group with approximately 3,700 people living near the coast in an area of about 12,000 km2; and the third-largest group are the Bedzang who live in the forests north-west of Mbam (Ngambe-Tikar), in the Central Region.

Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) Submission on Safeguards Information System (SIS)

Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) position on the Safeguards Information System (SIS).

The submission was made to the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) on 24 Sept. 2014. The submission includes the list of 37 endorsements from indigenous peoples organisations and civil society organisations.

Indigenous Peoples' Rights and Climate Policies in Guyana: a special report

 

More than four years after the signing of the Guyana-Norway MoU, this special report seeks to assess the quality of treatment of indigenous peoples’ rights in Guyana’s national policies on land, low carbon development and forests. The review draws on extensive community visits and policy analyses conducted by the Amerindian Peoples Association (APA) and the Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) between 2009 and 2013.

Impacts of German private sector involvement for Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities in the Maï-Ndombe REDD+ Project in the DRC

This is a case study on the Maï Ndombe REDD Project, which is financially supported by the German based company "Forest Carbon Group AG"  through the local company ERA Carbon Offsets (now known as Offsetters Climate Solutions Inc.).  The objective of the case study is to examine the implementation of this project especially in relation to the rights of indigenous and local communities to Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) in the elaboration and implementation of project activities, in order to (i) help stakeholders in Germany better understand the situation with regard to the

FPP E-Newsletter July 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Mutual recognition, mutual respect and mutual benefit are among the desirable attributes of all human relationships. Indigenous peoples and other forest peoples also expect these qualities in their relationships with others – be they governments, private corporations, NGOs or other indigenous peoples’ organisations and communities. This issue of Forest Peoples Programme’s E-Newsletter reports on the state of various relationships between forest peoples and different institutions – as these are forged, tested or broken –in the course of assertions for upholding basic human rights, social justice and solidarity.

The Status of the REDD+ process in the Democratic Republic of Congo

The considerable threats faced by the forests of the Democratic Republic of the Congo continue to draw global attention because of the crucial role these large forests play in regulating the global climate. Estimates indicate that the forests of the Congo Basin as a whole capture and store about 10 to 30 billion tons of carbon, an increasingly significant ecosystem service in light of concerns about climate change. In recent years, projects aimed at the reduction of emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) have been developed to provide financial incentives based on performance to the owners of large areas of forests in order to reduce the loss of forests and promote the improvement of carbon stocks through conservation and tree planting.

FPP E-Newsletter February 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Whenever someone remarks that a solution is being frustrated by ‘lack of political will’, I automatically ask myself: whose is the political will and what are the interests pushing for the opposite? 

REDD+ systems on providing information on safeguards (SIS): Inclusion of data relevant for indigenous peoples

Developing countries’ remaining forests are spaces inhabited by indigenous peoples. These spaces have been shaped, protected and expanded by indigenous peoples over generations. The relationship of indigenous peoples to forests is linked to livelihoods, cultures, world views and traditional knowledge and may be expressed through forms of customary tenure, land use and resource use. By proposing social and rights-based indicators and building blocks, this document promotes a view of REDD+ that is holistic and secures carbon stocks, biodiversity and the rights of forest peoples.