Resources

Our Land, Our Life - A Participatory Assessment of Land Tenure

In Guyana, communities are suffering because they do not have title to the full extent of their traditional lands, or have no title at all. This report seeks to present a detailed picture of the current status of land rights for communities in the Potaro-Siparuni region (Region 8) in west-central Guyana.

Press Release: Amerindian Peoples Association calls for Government of Guyana to secure full extent of traditional lands

GEORGETOWN, May 13, 2016: The Amerindian Peoples Association (APA) held its 9th General Assembly on 10-12 May 2016 in the village of Pakuri, Region 4. The main issues discussed during the assembly included land rights, climate change, and the various social and environmental issues affecting indigenous communities throughout the country. The assembly also highlighted the proactive measures communities are engaged in to build a stronger, greener, and more just Guyana.

Securing Forests, Securing rights: Report of the International Workshop on Deforestation and the Rights of Forest Peoples

The global forest crisis is worsening and infringements of the rights of indigenous peoples and forest-dependent communities are rising, according to a detailed assessment of nine country cases. Climate change mitigation and conservation policies must place community land rights and human rights centre-stage if they are to achieve the goal of sustainably reducing deforestation says the report.

Mengamankan Hutan, Mengamankan Hak: Laporan Lokakarya Internasional tentang Deforestasi dan Hak-Hak Masyarakat Hutan Diselenggarakan di Palangka Raya, Indonesia, Maret 2014

Pada tahun 2012 dunia kehilangan lebih dari 20 juta hektar hutan. Kehilangan luasan hutan ini menambah ancaman yang dihadapi oleh ratusan juta masyarakat yang menggantungkan hidupnya pada hutan tropis, termasuk setidaknya 350 juta masyarakat adat yang menghuni, memanfaatkan, memiliki hak adat atas hutan, dan mengandalkan hutan untuk identitas dan kelangsungan hidup mereka sebagai kelompok komunitas yang unik.

FPP E-Newsletter December 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

What are the prospects for securing the land rights of indigenous peoples, local communities, and women in the foreseeable future?

Significantly, the report of the United Nations Secretary-General’s High Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda, under Goal 1 to “End Poverty”, sets a target to “Increase by x% the share of women and men, communities, and businesses with secure rights to land, property, and other assets”.

FPP E-Newsletter July 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Mutual recognition, mutual respect and mutual benefit are among the desirable attributes of all human relationships. Indigenous peoples and other forest peoples also expect these qualities in their relationships with others – be they governments, private corporations, NGOs or other indigenous peoples’ organisations and communities. This issue of Forest Peoples Programme’s E-Newsletter reports on the state of various relationships between forest peoples and different institutions – as these are forged, tested or broken –in the course of assertions for upholding basic human rights, social justice and solidarity.

Lembar Berita Elektronik FPP Juli 2013 (versi PDF)

Teman-teman terhormat,

Saling mengakui, saling menghormati dan saling menguntungkan adalah atribut-atribut yang diinginkan dari semua hubungan manusia. Masyarakat adat dan masyarakat-masyarakat hutan lainnya juga mengharapkan hal-hal ini dalam hubungan mereka dengan orang lain – apakah dengan pemerintah, perusahaan swasta, NGO atau organisasi masyarakat adat dan komunitas lainnya. Edisi Lembar Berita Elektronik Forest Peoples Programme kali ini melaporkan keadaan hubungan-hubungan antara masyarakat hutan dengan berbagai lembaga – seraya hubungan-hubungan ini dibina, diuji atau pecah – dalam perjalanan penegasan untuk menegakkan hak asasi manusia, keadilan sosial dan solidaritas.

FPP E-Newsletter February 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Whenever someone remarks that a solution is being frustrated by ‘lack of political will’, I automatically ask myself: whose is the political will and what are the interests pushing for the opposite? 

Lembar Berita Elektronik FPP Februari 2013 (versi PDF)

Sahabat-sahabat tercinta,

Saat seseorang mengatakan bahwa suatu solusi gagal karena ‘kurangnya kemauan politik’, saya secara otomatis langsung bertanya pada diri sendiri: kemauan politik siapa dan kepentingan-kepentingan apa yang mendorong hal sebaliknya? 

Urgent communication on the situations of the Akawaio indigenous communities of Isseneru and Kako in Guyana, February 2013

This urgent communication by FPP and APA has been submitted to the UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, the UN Special Rapporteur on Cultural Rights, the UN Independent Expert on Human Rights Obligations relating to the Enjoyment of a Safe, Clean, Healthy and Sustainable Environment, the UN Special Rapporteur on to the

FPP E-Newsletter February 2012 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Balancing human beings’ need for decent livelihoods against the imperative of securing our environment is, arguably, the biggest challenge facing our planet. This struggle between ‘development’ and ‘conservation’ is being played out in global policy negotiations, with the decisions of so-called policy-makers being imposed on the ground. But not everything is or should be ‘top down’. Enduring solutions also spring from the grassroots, from the ‘bottom up’.

Press Release: Wapichan people in Guyana showcase community proposal to save tropical forests on their traditional lands

PRESS INFORMATION

Georgetown, 7 February: The indigenous Wapichan people of Guyana, South America, will make public today a locally-made digital map of their traditional territory alongside a ground-breaking community proposal to care for 1.4 million ha of pristine rainforest for the benefit of their communities and the world. The territory’s rich variety of rainforests, mountains, wetlands, savannah grasslands and tropical woodlands are the homeland of 20 communities, who make a living from small-scale farming, hunting, fishing and gathering, which they have practised over the whole area for generations. The same area, located in the South Rupununi District, south-west Guyana, has an outstanding abundance of wildlife, including endangered species such as giant river otters, jaguars, and rare bush dogs as well as endemic species of fish and birds, like the Rio Branco Antbird.

The grassroots proposal comes at a crucial time because the entire Wapichan territory in Guyana, like many other parts of the Amazon basin and Guiana Shield, is threatened by mega road and dam projects as well as external plans for logging, mining and agribusiness development. In common with many indigenous peoples across Guyana and South America, the communities are vulnerable to land grabs and marginalisation because they lack secure legal title over much of their traditional lands.

Press Release Guyana - Indigenous leaders harassed for exercising their constitutional rights; criticized for demanding respect for their inherent land rights

Indigenous leaders, who chose to exercise their right to free speech as guaranteed in the Constitution of Guyana, are now being targeted by the government as a direct result of the public statement by participants at the Workshop on Indigenous Peoples' Rights, Extractive Industries and National Development Policies in Guyana. (See the public statement under related reports)Press Release issued by the Amerindian Peoples Association (APA)