Resources

Joy and disappointment go hand in hand at the 10th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity

In the early morning hours of Saturday 30th October, after two weeks of intense, late-night sessions and down-to-the wire negotiations, the Parties to the Convention on Biodiversity (CBD) at their 10th Conference (COP 10), adopted a “package” which consists of a protocol on Access and Benefit Sharing, a new Strategic Plan, and a strategy for the mobilization of resources to effectively implement the convention. In addition, more than forty other Decisions were adopted, including Decisions on: Biodiversity and Climate Change; Protected Areas; Sustainable Use; and Traditional Knowledge, Innovations and Practices. Indigenous peoples celebrated some victories, but also returned home with concerns.

Global Environment Facility finally plans to adopt social safeguards

In October 2010, the head of the GEF, Monique Barbut, announced that the GEF would be developing safeguard policies. These safeguards will address the environmental and social impacts of projects, and specifically address the particular concerns of indigenous peoples. The safeguards will apply to all of the GEF’s Implementing and Executing Agencies and an external institution, or agency of some form, will monitor compliance. Indigenous peoples have seized this opportunity and have developed and presented a proposal to the GEF Council, outlining how a policy addressing their concerns could be developed.

Disappointment over reluctance of SBSTTA-14 to accept link between land rights and sustainable use and over the treatment of 'bush meat' issues

Our last E-newsletter (April 2010) reported that a group of indigenous experts on sustainable use issues within the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the '10(c) team', planned to highlight the link between secure land and resource rights and the protection and maintenance of customary sustainable use of biological resources by indigenous and local communities. This was to take place at the 14th meeting of the CBD's Subsidiary Body on Technical and Technological Advice (SBSTTA-14) in Nairobi, Kenya (10-21 May). Unfortunately, in the event, delegates did not follow the indigenous experts' proposals to include concrete text on this issue in the final SBSTTA recommendations. Discussions on the use and management of wildlife ('bush meat') also caused indigenous peoples great concern and created impassioned debate.

The FPP team at the Convention on Biological Diversity Conference of Parties

Nature is being destroyed all over the world. This issue is currently problematised as the destruction of biodiversity. States have started to work together to prevent this in 1992 by signing the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in Rio, Brasil. They have been meeting every two years ever since. The 10th Conference of parties (COP) starts today in Nagoya, Japan, to review the global strategy to halt biodiversity loss for the next decade. This is an incredibly complex and technical process with a 195 pages draft decision that will be negotiated for two weeks.

Will the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity finally accept proposed solutions to halt biodiversity loss that also benefit forest communities?

Click here for FPP & Partners' 'CBD COP 10 - Nagoya Blog' to follow indigenous peoples and local community representatives in Nagoya online.

For all forest peoples, the 10th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP 10) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), starting today, October 18, 2010 in Nagoya, Japan, is a critical one: their governments will make new agreements on the conservation, use, and development of the world’s natural riches. As most of these resources are found in indigenous peoples’ territories, the future directions of the Convention will have far-reaching impacts on forest peoples’ lands, livelihoods and way of life. Will forest communities’ positive contributions to global biodiversity receive the attention they deserve and will their interests and rights be respected? Or, will they be limited to a few minor paragraphs in the Decisions of COP 10?

Synthesis Paper - 10(c) Case Studies

Synthesis Paper - Customary sustainable use of biodiversity by indigenous peoples and local communities: Examples, challenges, community initiatives and recommendations relating to CBD Article 10(c)

A Synthesis Paper based on Case Studies from Bangladesh, Cameroon, Guyana, Suriname, Venezuela, Suriname and Thailand.

Guyana: indigenous peoples continue to be left out

During May, the Norwegian Government announced that it had signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Government of Guyana to contribute US$230 million towards the country's Low Carbon Development Strategy (LCDS). It only remained to be decided which financial agency would act as the intermediary with the fiduciary responsibility to make sure the monies were handed over with due care. Would this be the World Bank and what standards would the World Bank follow to supply this money?

Indigenous peoples raise concerns over failure to meet protected area participation and benefit-sharing targets at Convention of Biological Diversity's SBSTTA-14 and in response to Global Biodiversity Outlook 3

Most of the world's biodiversity targets have not been met. This is the key message of the third edition of the Global Biodiversity Outlook (GBO-3), presented at the Convention of Biological Diversity (CBD)'s 14th meeting of the Subsidiary Body on Scientific, Technical and Technological Advice (SBSTTA-14). The report does, however, choose to highlight the expansion of protected areas as a positive accomplishment. For indigenous peoples this is a cause for concern - not a success - as the establishment and expansion of protected areas still largely takes place without their participation and consent. This concern was underlined in the conclusions of the in-depth review of the implementation of the CBD's Programme of Work on Protected Areas (PoWPA).

Free, Prior and Informed Consent - Making FPIC work for Forests and Peoples

The right of indigenous peoples to give or withhold their free prior and informed consent to projects, laws and policies that may affect their rights is affirmed in international law. Making this right effective is more challenging: and what should private sector companies do to ensure they respect this right? This 'scoping paper'has been prepared by FPP for The Forests Dialogue to stimulate an interactive discussion about how to respect FPIC in practice among all those concerned about forests and rights.

Scoping paper prepared for The Forest Dialogue's (TFD) FPIC Initiative.

Bangladesh - Cyclone Aila: continued suffering one year on

Cyclone Aila hit the south-western coastal belt of Bangladesh, more specifically the Satkhira and Khulna Districts, on 25 May 2009, affecting almost 2.3 million people and immediately killing 325. The tidal surge, which measured 10-13m, inundated the region and washed away huge numbers of houses, livestock, crops and other resources within a very short time.

Free, Prior and Informed Consent: Making FPIC work for forests and peoples

The shorthand phrase ‘free, prior and informed consent,’ and the acronym FPIC, refers to the right of indigenous peoples to give or withhold their free, prior and informed consent to proposed measures that will affect them. The right is affirmed in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and in the jurisprudence of the international human rights treaty bodies including the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights.