Resources

International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity (IIFB) Statement to the Press, Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea

Press release from the press conference held by IIFB at the 12th meeting of the Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity.The press release addresses an impasse that has emerged within the negotiations concerning the use of the terminology "Indigenous Peoples and local communities" to replace the current phrase "indigenous and local communities".IIFB Press Statement

Video: Workshop on customary sustainable use at Conference of the World Indigenous Network

The inaugural Conference of the World Indigenous Network (WIN) took place in Darwin, Australia from 26 to 31 May 2013. The WIN conference was designed to build a strong foundation for an innovative and enduring network of land and sea managers, with a programme aimed at coming together, connecting and sharing stories and experiences of indigenous peoples and local communities who have an active role in managing natural environments. Read more about the WIN here: http://www.worldindigenousnetwork.net/ 

Parties to the Biodiversity Convention not ready to accept ‘indigenous peoples’

A disappointing outcome for indigenous peoples at the 11th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP11) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in Hyderabad, India, 8-19 October 2012: Parties failed to adopt a decision to update the CBD’s terminology ‘indigenous and local communities’ to ‘indigenous peoples and local communities’, due to the resistance of a few Parties.

Sustainable Development Update: Building resilience through customary sustainable use of biodiversity

"Since almost a decade back, the Resilience and Development Programme (SwedBio) and partners such as Forest Peoples ProgrammeTebtebba Foundation and the International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity (IIFB) have been working for strengthening governance in indigenous territories based on customary sustainable use. The work by SwedBio and partners was initiated by supporting good cases, including presenting them and describing the key factors for success behind. These pilot cases, covering a broad range of social ecological systems, have successively formed a base for building better international policies that adopt customary sustainable use (CSU) as a means for strengthened resilience of biological diversity and contribution to human wellbeing among indigenous peoples and local communities."

Karen People forcibly expelled from the Kaeng Krachan National Park in Thailand

In January, indigenous peoples’ organisations sent a letter to the Prime Minister of Thailand, Yingluck Shinawatra, asking her to take immediate action to redress the forcible expulsion of Karen people from their ancestral territory in north-western Thailand, which is now overlapped by the Kaeng Krachan National Park.

According to sources that have visited Kaeng Krachan National Park and collected information, the harassment of Karen villagers has been going on for some time and became severe in May, June and July 2011, when many of the villagers’ houses and rice stores were burned and money, jewellery, fishing and agricultural tools were stolen by a group comprising National Park wardens and military forces. As a result, some of these villagers moved away and are now staying with relatives elsewhere and a number of them (allegedly around 70 people) are hiding in the forest in fear of meeting government officers, and are without sufficient food and shelter.  

CBD Working Group agrees on development of new Plan of Action on Customary Sustainable Use of biological resources

At the recent meeting of the Convention on Biological Diversity’s (CBD) Working Group on traditional knowledge, innovations and practices (Article 8(j) and Related Provisions) , which took place in Montreal, Canada, from 31October to 4 November 2011, Forest Peoples Programme and indigenous and local community partners, alongside the International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity (IIFB), engaged in discussions with delegates and others about the development of a new “Plan of Action on Customary Sustainable Use”. This Plan of Action is intended to become a new major component of the already existing Programme of Work that serves to preserve, respect and maintain indigenous peoples’ and local communities’ traditional knowledge, innovations and practices that are related to sustainable use and conservation of biodiversity.