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Views of FPP partners on Rio+20 summit

Forest Peoples Programme and a delegation of indigenous peoples’ leaders from Guyana, Suriname, Peru, Panama and Kenya attended the Rio+20 Indigenous Peoples’ International Conference on Self-Sustainable Development and Self-Determination from 17-19 June and the formal Rio+20 intergovernmental meeting from 20-22 June 2012.

Reflections on Rio+20, Sustainable Development and the Green Economy by Robert Guimaraes, Shipibo-Konibo People, Amazon School of Human Rights, Peru

The outcomes of governments’ negotiations at Rio+20 do contain some useful elements, especially the recognition of the importance of diverse economies and development policies. However, although human rights have been reaffirmed in the governments’ ‘vision’ for the future, the topic was not incorporated into many of the results. In general, there are few clear policies or commitments with respect to indigenous peoples. The lack of recognition is evident, for example, in the text on forests, which does not mention our peoples that sustain the majority of the world’s remaining natural forests within our ancestral territories through our customary practices and values. In my view, the results from Rio+20 do not constitute a significant breakthrough because they leave out key rights issues, such as the right to free, prior and informed consent (FPIC).

Rio+20: Indigenous views on new draft text of the outcome document

Draft Rio+20 proposed outcomes document a mixed bag: UNDRIP is acknowledged and some positive elements are likely to be secured on traditional knowledge, but other outcomes lack vital and much needed commitments on FPIC and other rights, while the text on forests ignores indigenous peoples and suffers from weak and possibly harmful language.

RIO+20 Conference might promote green economy and development at the expense of human rights and environmental justice - Parallel events will highlight demands and contribution of Indigenous Peoples

The UN Conference on Sustainable Development - Rio+20, is aimed at ensuring full implementation of international commitments on environment and social development. However, there are concerns that it will neglect the urgent need to respect indigenous peoples’ rights, traditional knowledge and self-determined development.

IISD: Indigenous Peoples Reiterate Rio+20 Messages

Article and photograph courtesy of IISD. See ENB on the Side, 21 March 2012 

Indigenous peoples reiterate their key messages for Rio +20 in a side event organized by Tebtebba and the Indigenous Information Network during the 3rd Intersessional Meeting for Rio +20 held in New York.This event, moderated by Karla General, Indian Law Resource Center, addressed key messages of the indigenous peoples for Rio+20.Joji Cariño, TEBTEBBA, supported the integration of a fourth cultural pillar of sustainable development in the zero draft of the Rio+20 outcomes document to encompass the values of indigenous peoples’ spirituality. She suggested: further integrating references to human rights for sustainable development; and respecting local economies, putting in place regulations to avoid land grabbing and predatory investments.

Indigenous leaders propose alternative approaches to forests and climate change, and discuss Rio+20

Indigenous leaders gathered in Manaus in mid-August for a conference organized by COICA (Confederation of the Indigenous Peoples’ Organizations of the Amazon Basin) to discuss traditional knowledge, forests and climate change, as well as the Rio+20 conference. Their final statement called for the recognition of Indigenous Peoples’ rights to their territories, respect for the principle of the ‘full life’[1] (‘vida plena’) and support for Indigenous approaches to climate mitigation in forests, (referred to in the statement as “Indigenous REDD+”). Communities were also advised to be alert to the bad practices of “carbon cowboys” and avoid entering into any contracts until international obligations on rights are fully implemented.