Resources

A letter on the weaknesses of REDD in Peru

A letter from AIDESEP to the Participants Committee of the FCPF on the 20 March 2017 in which AIDESEP highlights the holes and weaknesses of the REDD strategy in Peru as indicated in the mid-term evaluation report of the project and the broken commitments of the government made with indigenous peoples to recognise and respect their t

Agreement reached on unified High Carbon Stocks method

Bangkok: Major palm oil producers and environmental NGOs announced today their agreement on a method to decide which forests must be conserved for companies to uphold their ‘no deforestation’ commitments. Forest Peoples Programme, which has been engaging closely in the process (links), welcomed the outcome.

Is carbon funding hurting forest peoples? Evidence from Madagascar

The Paris Agreement of December 2015 encourages countries “…to take action to implement and support, including through results-based payments…activities relating to reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation” (Article 5)  as a key policy instrument for climate change mitigation. The Agreement also acknowledges the need to respect human rights in all climate actions. In principle, new investment in protected areas and REDD+ projects, by the World Bank and other international donors, are tied to strong social safeguards. These should be designed to ensure that a project does no harm and respects the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities. At present, UN climate change convention safeguards go further and require carbon funding to provide additional social and ‘non-carbon’ benefits, though World Bank safeguards still fall short of this.

‘High Carbon Stocks Forests’: challenges in implementation

In response to consumer pressure to eliminate deforestation from products on supermarket shelves, corporations have been making numerous ‘Zero Deforestation’ pledges, often accompanied by ‘Zero Exploitation’ commitments. These companies seek to ensure that products in their ‘supply chains’ do not ‘embody deforestation’ and are not linked to land grabs and abuse of human and labour rights. These commitments are welcome but raise numerous questions: what do they require in practice and how can companies’ performance be verified?

The way ahead from Paris COP21: risks and opportunities for indigenous peoples

The final UN climate summit outcomes in Paris were weak on rights, but open the way to greater recognition of indigenous peoples’ traditional knowledge in climate policies and actions in the post 2020 climate regime.

Securing Indigenous Peoples’ rights to land and effective compliance with the FPIC standard will be key to ensure legality and sustainability in the implementation of climate programmes and  financing.  

Submission on the Green Climate Fund Environmental and Social Management System (ESMS)

Joint submission of Tebtebba (Indigenous Peoples' International Centre for Policy Research and Education) and Forest Peoples Programme as a response to the Call for for Public Inputs on the Environmental and Social Management System of the Green Climate Fund.

The joint Civil Society Organizations submission on the ESMS contains a set of proposals for procedures aimed at identifying assessing and managing social and environmental risks, while defining roles and responsibilities of the various actors and guidelines for monitoring and reporting.

Forest Peoples Programme Dialogue on Community-based Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV)

From 16-19 Nov. 2015, FPP in collaboration with its local partners working across the Africa region organized in Yaoundé in Cameroon a meeting on Monitoring Reporting and Verification (MRV). The objective of this MRV meeting was to develop a common approach to community-based monitoring and set out appropriate indicators and tools for MRV that FPP and partners can mainstream throughout various initiatives on the ground to secure the rights of forest communities.

The Situation of Indigenous Peoples in Paraguay: Their lands and the Laws that Would Protect Them

On 12 November 2015, Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) and its partner in Paraguay, the Federación por la Autodeterminación de los Pueblos Indígenas (FAPI) released a companion set of reports describing the current situation of indigenous people, their lands, resources, and territories in Paraguay, along with the national legal framework that is meant to respect, promote and protect their rights.  Many have argued that the last big “land grab” with respect to indigenous lands, resources and territories will not be from large infrastructure projects, but from conservation and resource protection initiatives.

Removing Rights for Indigenous Peoples places Forests and Climate Plan at Risk

The outcome of a fierce debate in play during negotiations in Paris will determine whether the world succeeds in slowing the climate change that places all humanity at risk.

Statement from Paris, COP21. Paris, December 07, 2015.

By Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

New Analysis Reveals that Indigenous Lands Hold More than 20% of World’s Tropical Forest Carbon

New analysis of forests in indigenous territories shows recognizing, protecting rights of traditional peoples can make major contribution to slowing climate change and would support nat'l commitments to reduce climate impacts

An analysis released at the UN climate conference (known as COP 21) maps and quantifies, for the first time, the carbon stored in indigenous territories across the world’s largest expanses of remaining tropical forest.

Ten Reasons Why Climate Initiatives Should Not Include Large Hydropower Projects: A Civil Society Manifesto for the Support of Real Climate Solutions

Large hydropower projects are often propagated as a “clean and green” source of electricity by international financial institutions, national governments and other actors. They greatly benefit from instruments meant to address climate change, including carbon credits under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), credits from the World Bank’s Climate Investment Funds, and special financial terms from export credit agencies and green bonds.