Resources

“We can’t see the wood for the trees” – the worrying reality of conservation in Peru, and a way to improve it

Peru’s approach to conservation and natural resources is discriminatory and violates the human rights of indigenous peoples. Rather than marginalising these peoples, who have a long and varied history of conservation, conservation actors must recognise their enormous contribution to Peru’s natural heritage, and ally themselves with these communities against the true enemies of nature.

Indigenous peoples declare state of environmental emergency in the Peruvian Amazon

Communities in the Bajo Huallaga area of the Peruvian Amazon declared an “environmental and territorial emergency” on 16 September this year following serious and ongoing impacts on their natural resources, territories and inhabitants caused by land grabs and deforestation of their lands by loggers and palm oil companies.

Pueblos indigenas declaran estado de emergencia ambiental en la Amazonia Peruana

Comunidades en Bajo Huallaga, en la Amazonía peruana, han declarado una “emergencia ambiental y territorial” el 16 de septiembre de este año, con motivo de graves y reiterados impactos hacia sus recursos naturales, sus territorios y sus poblaciones debido al acaparamiento y deforestación de sus tierras por madereros y empresas de palma aceitera.

Wampis autonomous government declares a state of environmental emergency after oil spill

The Wampis autonomous government has issued a Supreme Order declaring the area affected the oil spill in the community of Mayuriaga to be in a state of environmental emergency.

According to Peru’s regulatory body of the environment OEFA, 1,000 barrels of oil spilled into the community land on 3 February 2016 when a 40-year-old pipeline owned by the state oil company Petroperú ruptured.

The spill affected 400m2 of land, and flowed into the Cashacaño river, which then flows into the river Morona.

Recognizing and expanding the territories of original peoples in Colombia is critical for the peace process

Press Note for the Global call to action on Indigenous and Community Land Rights

In Colombia, over 30% of the national territory has been officially titled to Indigenous Peoples, with some 6 million hectares of collective lands recognized for Afro-Descendant Communities. Nonetheless, in practice these territories are not recognized in the State’s actions, with mining, oil and gas, logging and other concessions issued unilaterally without upholding Indigenous or Afro-Descendant Peoples’ right to free, prior and informed consent.

Pushing for peace in Colombia: Indigenous and Afro-Descendant Peoples join forces to uphold their rights, address mining-related conflict

This report synthesizes the outcomes of Year 1 (2014-2015) of a two year inter-ethnic project between the Embera Chamí People of the Resguardo Indígena Cañamomo Lomaprieta (Riosucio, Supía – Caldas) and Afro-Descendant Communities of the Palenke Alto Cauca – Proceso de Comunidades Negras (northern Cauca) aimed at organizational strengthening and territorial defense around extractives and ethnic rights, with technical support by the Forest Peoples Programme. The project is funded by the Embassy of Norway in Colombia, and the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

Where They Stand

Where They Stand details how Wapichan people in South America use modern technologies in the struggle to secure their land rights

The Wapichan people of Guyana are using modern technology and community research to seek legal recognition of their ancestral land in the face of aggressive land-grabbing, destructive logging, and poisonous mining by illegal miners and foreign companies, finds new report by internationally acclaimed science writer Fred Pearce.

The Indigenous Wampis people of the Upper Amazon in Peru set to establish their own autonomous self governing body

The Indigenous Wampis people of the Upper Amazon in Peru are on the verge of establishing their own autonomous self governing  body to control and oversee their integralterritory. The Wampis communities reject large dam, road and hydrocarbon projects in their territory, (Statements and resolutions available in Spanish only).

Click here to view the statements

Statement A

La nación indígena Wampis del Alto Amazonas en Perú formará su propio organismo autónomo de autogobierno

La nación indígena Wampis del Alto Amazonas en Perú formará su propio organismo autónomo de autogobierno para controlar y vigilar su territoriointegral. Las comunidades Wampis rechazan las grandes represas, las carreteras, la minería ilegal y los proyectos de extracción de hidrocarburosen su territorio. Septiembre de 2015 (resoluciones y declaraciones disponibles únicamente en español).

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Acta A