Resources

President of Suriname shuts down land rights conference following clear demands from indigenous and tribal peoples

Indigenous and tribal peoples of Suriname still open to dialogue

By the Association of Indigenous Village Leaders in Suriname (VIDS)

A conference organised by the Government of Suriname on 21 and 22 October 2011, which was meant to clarify positions and proposals on land rights and build mutual understanding between the Government and indigenous and tribal (maroon) peoples, ended in a very abrupt manner. The Government even called it “a disaster” on 23 October 2011. Surprised by the massive solidarity and collaboration between the indigenous and tribal peoples of Suriname, and in a move that showed great disrespect to traditional leaders who had traveled long distances to attend the conference, the President of Suriname decided to close the conference early following the indigenous and tribal peoples’ presentation of their joint position on land and resource rights. With this, all subsequent dialogue between the indigenous and tribal peoples and the government has ceased.

Maraka

Deze nieuwsbrief is een uitgave van de Vereniging van Inheemse Dorpshoofden in Suriname (VIDS).(Newsletter of the Association of Indigenous Village Leaders in Suriname - available in Dutch only)

FPP series on Forest Peoples and Protected Areas

This series of eight country studies and a synthesis report review the progress of the application of indigenous peoples' rights with regards to protected areas since 2003. By considering the views of governments, funding agencies, conservation organisations and indigenous peoples' organisations, these studies assesses the extend to which recommendations and resolutions from the Durban 2003 World Parks Congress, the 4th World Conservation Congress in Barcelona and the Convention on Biological Diversity have been followed up on and enacted.

Suriname 10(c) Case Study

Marauny Na’na Emandobo / Lokono Shikwabana (“Marowijne – our territory”) - Traditional use and management of the Lower Marowijne area by the Kaliña and Lokono

Conceived as a tool to aid Suriname to implement the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), this report describes traditional methods of hunting, fishing, house- and boat-building and also details the customary laws and practices followed by these peoples to ensure that their use of the flora and fauna safeguards the rich biodiversity of the area.

Press release: UN Racial Discrimination Committee recommends Suriname's urgent action to recognize and respect the land and resource rights of indigenous peoples and Maroons

The forested interior of Suriname is home to Amazonian Indians and so-called Maroons, descendants of escaped African slaves who recreated societies in Suriname’s hinterland in the 17th and 18th centuries. These peoples have long complained that they suffer persistent and pervasive racial discrimination that is particularly evident in the government’s failure to recognize their rights to their ancestral lands, which have instead been parcelled out to loggers, miners and as protected areas. Last week, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination agreed with them for a second time in a year.