Resources

Press release: UN Racial Discrimination Committee recommends Suriname's urgent action to recognize and respect the land and resource rights of indigenous peoples and Maroons

The forested interior of Suriname is home to Amazonian Indians and so-called Maroons, descendants of escaped African slaves who recreated societies in Suriname’s hinterland in the 17th and 18th centuries. These peoples have long complained that they suffer persistent and pervasive racial discrimination that is particularly evident in the government’s failure to recognize their rights to their ancestral lands, which have instead been parcelled out to loggers, miners and as protected areas. Last week, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination agreed with them for a second time in a year.

Protecting and encouraging customary use of biological resources: The Upper Caura, Venezuela - 10(c) Case Study

Article 10(c) of the CBD requires States to protect and encourage customary use of biological resources. This study of and by the indigenous Ye'kwana and Sanema peoples of the Upper Caura, Venezuela, demonstrates that their traditional practices are clearly ‘compatible with conservation and sustainable use’. Encouragingly, the legal framework for State compliance already exists and merely needs to be put into practice.