Resources

Revealing the Hidden: Indigenous Perspectives on Deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon

 

The report, Revealing the Hidden: Indigenous perspectives on deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon was compiled by Peru’s national indigenous peoples’ organisation (AIDESEP) and international human rights organisation, Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) and is based on the analysis and perspectives of Peru’s indigenous leaders and organisations whose lives, lands and livelihoods are threatened by deforestation on a daily basis.

Peru’s government fails to tackle violence and forest destruction in the Peruvian Amazon

In April 2014, in a tragic premonition of what was to come, the leaders of Saweto, an Ashaninka village in the Peruvian Amazon, requested urgent measures from the Peruvian government to ‘prevent any attempt on our lives’. The threat had come from loggers ‘in reprisal’ for the community’s longstanding efforts to document and denounce illegal logging in their territory.

Shipibo community sues Peruvian government for failure to title traditional lands

23rd October 2014, Pucallpa: The Shipibo indigenous community of Korin Bari today filed a law suit against the Peruvian government for its failure to title its traditional territory resulting in the repeated invasion of community lands by illegal loggers and coca growers threatening the lives of community members who protest.

Peru's indigenous leaders face life sentences for defending their rights

On the 14th May 2014 the trial will begin of 53 of Peru's indigenous leaders who are charged with crimes related to the tragic events at Bagua on the 5th June 2009 where over 20 people died and hundreds were injured after Peruvian forces opened fire on indigenous peoples blockading a road in peaceful protest at the efforts of the Peruvian government to dismantle legal protections for their lands.

AIDESEP calls for modification of Peruvian Forestry Law which threatens indigenous peoples’ lands and rights

The executive committee of AIDESEP (the national indigenous peoples organisation of the Peruvian Amazon) has issued a critical analysis of the proposed regulations for Peru’s new Forestry Law. The analysis highlights some of its improvements including measures to enable state procurement of community forest products and the requirement of concession owners to include an assessment of their impact on surrounding areas in their management plans. However, it highlights that the observations made consistently over many years by indigenous organisations remain unincorporated.