Resources

Groundbreaking study carried out by indigenous peoples in Guyana highlights land tenure insecurity and urgent need for reform

The Amerindian Peoples Association (APA) is pleased to present a new comprehensive study on the lack of tenure security faced by indigenous communities in Guyana’s Northwest District. ‘Our Land, Our Life: A participatory assessment of the land tenure situation of indigenous peoples in Guyana’ was published in collaboration with UK non-governmental organisation Forest Peoples Programme (FPP).

Local Biodiversity Outlooks

A publication bringing together the perspectives and experiences of indigenous peoples and local communities (IPLCs) on the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity has been officially launched at the thirteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD COP13) in Cancun, Mexico.

Exploring the link between culture and biodiversity – CBD COP13

The important link between cultural and biological diversity was highlighted as part of the “Múuch'tambal” Summit on Indigenous Experience: Traditional Knowledge, biological and cultural diversity at COP13 today.

Among those speaking at the thirteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD COP13) were indigenous peoples and local communities from around the world, including Mexico, Japan, Chile, and the Solomon Islands.

Interview with Arnobia Moreno on women and indigenous land rights in Colombia

Arnobia Moreno lives in the indigenous Resguardo Cañamomo Lomaprieta, one of the oldest colonial reserves in Colombia. Over the years she has played a key role in involving women in the protection and conservation of their traditional land. As part of the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence, Arnobia told us about the importance of the Collective of Indigenous Women, which she helped creating, and her work to obtain the restitution of the original territory of the indigenous communities living in the Resguardo. 

Pinpointing problems – seeking solutions: A rapid assessment of the underlying causes of forest conflicts in Guyana

Based on the experiences of Amerindian communities in Guyana, this briefing presents some of the main causes of forest conflicts in the country as well as recommendations for how to address these. In particular, the document presents the following points: • Lack of full recognition of indigenous peoples’ land rights in line with international law, absence of effective FPIC procedures and limited transparency in forest governance are key underlying causes of forest-related conflicts in Guyana; 

Indigenous peoples in Peru score historical victory in securing agreements to correct a flawed land titling project financed by the Inter-American Development Bank - IDB

Peruvian Amazon indigenous peoples’ organisation AIDESEP has successfully used the IDB Complaint Mechanism (ICIM) coupled with sustained dialogue with senior IDB officials to secure major reforms to a potentially harmful land titling project, which threatened to title land to settlers and carve up indigenous peoples’ forest territories.

Posicionamiento de la FAPI en el Día Internacional de los Pueblos Indígenas

La Federación por la Autodeterminación de los Pueblos Indígenas (FAPI), órgano que articula a 12 asociaciones de ambas regiones del país, en el Día Internacional de los Pueblos Indígenas,  establecido por la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas el 23 de diciembre de 1994, manifestamos cuanto sigue:

La Mesa Nacional Indígena de Costa Rica conmemora el Día Internacional de los Pueblos Indígenas

La Mesa Nacional Indígena de Costa Rica (MNICR) conmemora el Día Internacional de los Pueblos Indígenas y envita a reflexionar sobre la voluntad del estado costarricense para cumplir en la práctica los derechos indígenas y atender las demandas y propuestas de los pueblos para superar la situación de vulnerabilidad a que han sido sometidos por las políticas, programas, proyectos y acciones estatales.

Chile: when ‘sustainability’ demands armed protection

The Mapuche are the most populous indigenous people in Chile. They long resisted the Spanish colonial conquest and in 1641 secured a treaty with Spanish Crown recognising their rights to all their remaining lands south of the BioBio river - some 10 million hectares of their ancestral lands.

Indigenous leaders in the Amazon face death threats as community files lawsuit against Peruvian government for violation of their land rights

Leaders of the Shipibo indigenous village of Santa Clara de Uchunya, accompanied by their representative organisation FECONAU, filed a constitutional law suit challenging Peru’s regional government authorities for failing to secure legal protection of their traditional lands and enabling its acquisition and clearance by an international agribusiness company.

Press Release: Amerindian Peoples Association calls for Government of Guyana to secure full extent of traditional lands

GEORGETOWN, May 13, 2016: The Amerindian Peoples Association (APA) held its 9th General Assembly on 10-12 May 2016 in the village of Pakuri, Region 4. The main issues discussed during the assembly included land rights, climate change, and the various social and environmental issues affecting indigenous communities throughout the country. The assembly also highlighted the proactive measures communities are engaged in to build a stronger, greener, and more just Guyana.

Palm oil industry group orders company to halt Peru planting

Source: Reuters - Tue, 26 Apr 2016 00:58 GMT, Author: Reuters

LIMA, April 25 (Reuters) - A palm oil industry body on Monday ordered a member company with a 5,000 hectare (12,355 acre) concession in Peru to stop developing new plantations until it can prove it has not cleared any primary forest.

The dispute comes amid growing concerns from environmentalist and indigenous communities about the rapid expansion of oil palm plantations in the Peruvian Amazon in recent years.

Secure territorial rights of indigenous peoples and traditional knowledge must be central to post-conflict initiatives to save the Colombian Amazon and achieve sustainable development

Bogotá, April 25: A new report “Deforestation and indigenous peoples rights in the Colombian Amazon” co-published by social justice and environmental NGO DEDISE and Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) underlines the critical role of secure land and territorial rights and traditional knowledge in sustaining one of the most culturally and biologically diverse forests on the planet.