Resources

Serious setbacks in IFC’s handling of complaints about its support for Wilmar CAO admission of validity of NGO complaint regarding Wilmar ignored by IFC

UpdateFPP and 18 other NGOs, including local organisations in Indonesia, have been involved in a long-running process to get redress for the IFC’s persistent violations of its social and environmental policies in the palm oil sector in Indonesia. For over five years IFC has been providing financial support to the company Wilmar Trading / Wilmar International, one of the world’s largest palm oil dealers, directly and through various subsidiaries. In August 2007, FPP with other concerned NGOs and local organisations in Indonesia filed a complaint with the IFC Compliance Advisory Ombudsman (CAO) about this financing, alleging serious social and environmental problems in Wilmar’s operations, as well as violations of IFC’s own standards and procedures in making these credits and loans.

Press Release - Appeal to HSBC to become more accountable in palm oil sector

A new report by the Forest Peoples Programme launched today demands greater accountability from HSBC, the biggest bank funding the palm oil sector in South East Asia. The fast-expanding palm oil sector is known to be a major driver of deforestation and the take-over of indigenous peoples' lands without their consent. Conflicts between indigenous peoples and palm oil companies are widespread in Malaysia and Indonesia.

Appeal for solidarity to: Denounce the false implementation of the Forest Rights Act in North Bengal Protest against the attack on NFFPFW and NESPON members - Appeal by NESPON/National Forum of Forest Peoples and Forest Workers (NFFPFW)

Ever since the much-awaited implementation of the historic Forest Rights Act 2006 (FRA) had started in North Bengal, the State Government did everything possible to slaughter it. Grossly illegal orders were issued from the Writers Buildings, and the Government Officers in charge of the process have succeeded to make a mockery of the provisions of the Law.

HSBC and the palm oil sector in South East Asia: towards accountability

The fast-expanding palm oil sector is known to be a major driver of deforestation and of the take-over of indigenous peoples' lands without their consent. This report calls on HSBC to put pressure on the 17 major palm oil corporate groups that are among its clients in order to end violations of forest peoples' rights.

Free, Prior and Informed Consent and the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil - A guide for companies

A synthesis of training materials devised for communities and companies, and also local government, about how successful procedures can be carried out in line with the principle of FPIC - free, prior and informed consent - to enable indigenous peoples, local communities and other stakeholders to express their views in negotiations and for these views and wishes to be included in the RSPO's decision-making processes.

World Bank-funded energy project in India fails to meet agreed social standards - Press release

A recent independent NGO report on the World Bank-funded Lanco Power Station project in Chhattisgarh, India shows serious negative consequences for local communities, including loss of land, polluted rivers and receding water levels. The project is funded by the private sector arm of the World Bank, the International Finance Corporation (IFC), which adopted in 2006 a new set of social and environmental safeguards, which the report finds have not been properly applied.

IFC to be audited for policy violations over palm oil projects; NGO complaint regarding Wilmar taken up by CAO

Update

In July 2007, Forest Peoples Programme with 18 other NGOs including local groups in Indonesia filed a complaint with the International Finance Corporation's (IFC) Compliance Advisory Ombudsman (CAO) about the IFC's funding of the palm oil producing and trading company, Wilmar. The complaint raised concerns about the impacts of Wilmar's operations on local communities, company violations of Indonesian laws and environmental policies, and IFC staff's violations of IFC policies and procedures. We also complained that the IFC, as a member of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), was contravening RSPO rules by asserting on the IFC website that Wilmar's operations were compliant with the RSPO's standard.

Sustainable development or business as usual? A critical evaluation of the IFC-funded Lanco Amarkantak Thermal Power Station Project in Chhattisgarh, India

An analysis of the social impacts and community engagement process for an IFC-supported project in Chhattisgarh, India. It also provides an assessment of the application of IFC Performance Standard 7 (Indigenous Peoples) and related IFC standards and due diligence requirements, in the light of the project's significant adverse impacts on affected communities. It is based on a detailed reading of project documents, interviews and correspondence with relevant officials, and five days offieldwork conducted in the affected communities in March 2008.

Urgent communication concerning gross and persistent violations of the rights of indigenous peoples in North East India

Submitted to the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous peoples and the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights while countering terrorismSubmission by United NGOs Mission - Manipur (a network of 103 indigenous peoples' organisations) and the Forest Peoples Programme

Further Follow-up report to the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD)

Follow-up report to the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) regarding grave and persistent violations of indigenous peoples' rights in North East IndiaSubmitted to the 73rd Session of the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, 28 July - 15 August 2008         

(Also see original submission to CERD, CERD's Concluding Observations of March 2007, and Follow-up report, January 2008)

Press release - Parties to the CBD must respect and promote customary sustainable use to achieve conservation of biological diversity

Bonn, Germany The findings of two new reports launched today at the Convention on Biological Diversity emphatically demonstrate that global biodiversity will continue to be lost if Protected Areas fail to recognise and respect the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities. The research, conducted in the largest mangrove forest in the world, conversely shows that customary use is fully compatible with conservation and sustainability.