Resources

Submission to the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW): The Land Rights of Rural Women. 31 October 2013

A formal submission to the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) to contribute to the elaboration of a General Recommendation on Rural Women under the Convention. The submission highlights the specific circumstances of indigenous women and the need to focus on achieving coherence between CEDAW and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. 

Nepal: Identity and equality is all that indigenous women want

Source: MyRepublica

The contours of “New Nepal” we all dream of cannot be shaped without appropriately addressing the concerns being raised by the indigenous women, who comprise half the female population. Traditionally, these women enjoyed greater degree of freedom and socioeconomic status than those from the so-called high caste Hindu groups such as Bahun, Chhetri, and Thakuri, who were restricted by pervasive patriarchy and religious orthodoxy. Unlike these women of the Indo-Aryan origin, the indigenous women were adept in handicrafts and other enterprises and freely participated in socio-cultural events. They faced no restriction during menstruation and were even free to choose their life partner and to remarry if they became single. They were also less affected by the dowry system.

Indigenous women raise their voices at CEDAW

In July, the 49th Session of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) met in New York. Indigenous women in Nepal, under the umbrella of the Nepal Indigenous Women’s Federation (NIWF), attended the session for the first time to defend and explain the findings that they had presented to the Committee in their Shadow Report. 

The report was supported also by the Lawyer’s Association for the Human Rights of Nepal’s Indigenous Peoples (LAHURNIP) and by the Forest Peoples Programme, and represented the first national level, self-researched and written, report on the status of indigenous women in the newly emerging Nepalese republic.

The Rights of Indigenous Women in Nepal

A shadow report to the 49th Session of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), jointly submitted by the National Indigenous Women's Federation (NIWF), the Lawyers' Association for Human Rights of Nepalese Indigenous Peoples (LAHURNIP) and Forest Peoples Programme (FPP).

Upcoming AIWN & FPP publication: Guide to CEDAW for indigenous women in Asia

Asian Indigenous Women’s Network and Forest Peoples Programme have developed a series of booklets addressing the human rights framework, the rights of indigenous peoples and the rights of women as enshrined in and protected by the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women. The booklets have been designed specifically to address the situations of indigenous women in Asia and include a detailed compilation of existing CEDAW jurisprudence related to indigenous women.

Statement of Indigenous Participants at the Consultation on the World Bank's Draft Policy on Indigenous Peoples (OP/BP 4.10) - Dhaka, Bangladesh

This statement was jointly issued by representatives of the National Adivasi Coordination Committee, Bangladesh Adivasi Forum, Hill Tracts NGO Forum, Committee for the Protection of Forest and Land Rights in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, Hill Women's Federation, Rakhain Development Foundation, Mro Social Council, Tripura Kalyan Foundation, Khashia Students’ Association, Bawm Social Council, Trinamul Unnayan Sangstha, Zabarang Kalyan Samiti, Abima Garo Youth Association (AGYA), Society for Environment & Human Development (SEHD) and Taungya, and included representatives of the Bawm, Chakma, Garo, Khasi, Marma, Mro, Rakhain, Santal, Tanchangya and Tripura peoples from different parts of Bangladesh. The list of signatories is annexed hereto.