Indigenous Peoples - their forests, struggles and rights

This book gathers articles published in the monthly electronic bulletin of the World Rainforest Movement (WRM) regarding indigenous peoples and their struggles in defence of the forest. These peoples are the guardians of the forest and none are more interested than they in ensuring the conservation of the forests that have been their home, an integral part of their culture and the source of their livelihood.

Villagers return to site of 1986 Suriname massacre

Source: Reuters

MAROWIJNE DISTRICT, Suriname - Surviving relatives of 39 Maroon people killed in Suriname's Moiwana village massacre have returned to their birthplace for the first time since the 1986 killings for a memorial service.

UN's Committee on the Rights of the Child recommends government action to improve living conditions for Batwa children in Uganda

A shadow report was submitted to the UN's Committee on the Rights of the Child by FPP and UOBDU (United Organisation for Batwa Development in Uganda) which outlined the deplorable situation of Batwa children in Uganda. As a result, the Committee expressed its concern at the situation of Batwa children, in particular with regard to their limited access to basic social services, including health care and education, and the violation of their rights to survival and development, to enjoy their own culture and to be protected from discrimination.

Judgment of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in the Case of Moiwana Village, Suriname Summary of the Operative Points

I.   Background

On 29 November 1986, a unit of the National Army of Suriname surrounded the N’djuka maroon village of Moiwana and then proceeded to kill at least 39 members of the community. Many others were wounded and they, together with the other survivors, were forced to flee through the forest until they reached safety in French Guiana. For some this was a three to four day walk carrying wounded family members.

Urgent Action - Culture, environment and biodiversity endangered in Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh

The Bangladesh government is planning to settle many more thousands of plains people on the ancestral lands of indigenous peoples in the Chittagong Hill Tracts against the will of affected communities. This culturally and ecologically destructive proposal threatens to violate the fundamental rights of indigenous peoples and destroy valuable forest ecosystems, including the Kassalong forests.