Resources

Report from Kus Kura S.C on the UN Special Rapporteur’s official mission to Costa Rica to study the situation of indigenous peoples’ rights, in particular the rights of the Térraba people

The UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, S. James Anaya, visited Costa Rica on an official mission from 24-27 April 2011. His visit responds to an Urgent Request made by Forest Peoples Programme’s (FPP) partners in Costa Rica: Kus Kura S.C. and a number of Térraba indigenous peoples’ organisations.

The Urgent Request highlighted critical issues that the Térraba people are facing in their traditional lands, including: first, the denial of their territorial rights, and the massive encroachment on their lands by non-indigenous persons; second, the threat of irreparable harm caused by the proposed Diquís Dam that will permanently flood 10 percent of the Térraba lands (this will also affect other indigenous peoples as seven different indigenous territories are within the Térraba River basin); and third, the absence of effective judicial remedies to address the imposition of political-administrative structures in each territory (primarily local government bodies that are not fully accountable to indigenous peoples and are not their preferred form of political organisation).

UN human rights bodies take note of massive land speculation in Papua New Guinea

Lands held and managed under custom in Papua New Guinea (PNG) are regularly quoted as covering the vast majority of the country’s land mass, 97% is the usually accepted figure. The remaining 3% of lands, no longer governed by tradition and custom, are referred to as ‘alienated lands’ and come under the management of the Department of Lands and Physical Planning.  However these remarkable figures of land tenure security hide a grimmer truth. Over the past 13 months alone almost 10% of the land mass of Papua New Guinea has been issued out as concessions under an arrangement known as ‘Special Agricultural and Business Leases’ (SABL). Under these lease agreements, the government leases customary lands from traditional owners and re-leases the same lands, often to a third party, with customary rights to the lands suspended for the term of the lease.  

Nepal's indigenous peoples demand to participate in the revision of the constitution

In January 2010, the Indigenous Peoples Mega Front, the Lawyers' Association for Human Rights of Nepalese Indigenous Peoples (LAHURNIP) and the Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) submitted a request to the United Nations (UN) Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms of Indigenous Peoples, following Nepal's failure to comply with UN recommendations regarding the exclusion of indigenous peoples from the revision of Nepal's Constitution. Link to the Request to UN Special Rapporteur

Request to UN Special Rapporteur for follow-up on Nepal's failure to comply with UN recommendations regarding the exclusion of indigenous peoples from the revision of Nepal's Constitution

(See CERD's September 2009 communication to Nepal, in related reports)Submission to the UN Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms of Indigenous Peoples (SRIP)By the Indigenous Peoples Mega Front, the Lawyers' Association for Human Rights of Nepalese Indigenous Peoples (LAHURNIP), and the Forest Peoples Programme