From principles to practice: Indigenous peoples and protected areas in Africa - Case study 5: Uganda

Indigenous peoples and protected areas in Africa: From principles to practice
By
FPP

From principles to practice: Indigenous peoples and protected areas in Africa - Case study 5: Uganda

The impact of (forest) nature conservation on indigenous peoples: the Batwa of south-western Uganda. A case study of the Mgahinga and Bwindi Impenetrable Forest Conservation Trust.This study analyses the conflicts between wildlife and nature conversation and indigenous Batwa peoples in the Mgahinga and Bwindi National Parks, Uganda. Under its Global Environment Facility (GEF), the World Bank granted US $4.3 million in May 1991 to establish a trust fund in Uganda. The Mgahinga and Bwindi Impenetrable Forest Conservation Trust (MBIFCT, the 'Trust') was to cater for the needs of the Batwa former hunter-gatherers who had been officially denied access to their forest resource base when the forest reserves were established in the 1930s. The Trust was established to cater for the needs of the Batwa by dealing with issues of compensation for land lost, and maintenance of access to the forest for herbs and food. However, the problems of equitable access to the forest resources remain.This study aims to expose the obstacles to and advance solutions for observing the 'new model of conversation' in favour of Batwa communities in south-western Uganda.

THIS PUBLICATION HAS BEEN BROKEN DOWN INTO CHAPTERS FOR THE WEBSITE. TO SEE THE FULL DOCUMENT AND OTHER CHAPTERS CLICK HERE.FOR A HARD COPY OF THE COMPLETE BOOK CONTACT THE FPP OFFICEISBN: 0 9544252-1-9; Pages: 312 Binding: Paperback.