From principles to practice: Indigenous peoples and protected areas in Africa - Case study 7: Cameroon – Boumba Bek

Indigenous peoples and protected areas in Africa: From principles to practice
By
FPP

From principles to practice: Indigenous peoples and protected areas in Africa - Case study 7: Cameroon – Boumba Bek

Protected areas and indigenous peoples: the paradox of conservation and survival of the Baka in Moloundou region (south-east Cameroon)This case study focuses on a particular case which illustrates the paradox between the logic of conservation and the survival of indigenous peoples. More specifically it illustrates how the State has implemented its conservation policy, as manifested through its principles and rules, in a way that runs counter to the local populations’ vision and aims, and how the Baka Pygmies – designated a minority under Cameroon’s constitution of 18 January 1996 – live and perceive the impact of forests designated for conservation. The Moloundou region of south-east Cameroon, particularly the Baka camps at Banana and Bangoy, form the area where data was collected. These camps are located on the periphery of the National Parks of Boumba Bek/Nki to the west and Lobéké to the east.

THIS PUBLICATION HAS BEEN BROKEN DOWN INTO CHAPTERS FOR THE WEBSITE. TO SEE THE FULL DOCUMENT AND OTHER CHAPTERS CLICK HERE.FOR A HARD COPY OF THE COMPLETE BOOK CONTACT THE FPP OFFICEISBN: 0 9544252-1-9; Pages: 312 Binding: Paperback.