Recursos

Securing Forest Peoples’ Rights and Tackling Deforestation in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Deforestation and forest degradation have increased in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), despite the government’s commitment to safeguard its forests.

Illegal logging, unsustainable mining, commercial agriculture, and urban demand for fuelwood represent only some of the major long-term threats to the forests. By contrast, the traditional livelihood strategies of indigenous and local communities show a capacity to coexist with forests sustainably.

Sécuriser les droits des peuples forestiers et combattre la déforestation en République démocratique du Congo

La déforestation et la dégradation des forêts ont augmenté en République démocratique du Congo (RDC) malgré l’engagement du gouvernement de protéger ses forêts. Les activités commerciales d’envergure industrielle constituent d’importantes menaces directes à long terme sur les forêts. En revanche, les strategies et modes de subsistance traditionnelles des communautés autochtones et locales montrent qu’elles peuvent coexister durablement avec les forêts.

Wampis autonomous government declares a state of environmental emergency after oil spill

The Wampis autonomous government has issued a Supreme Order declaring the area affected the oil spill in the community of Mayuriaga to be in a state of environmental emergency.

According to Peru’s regulatory body of the environment OEFA, 1,000 barrels of oil spilled into the community land on 3 February 2016 when a 40-year-old pipeline owned by the state oil company Petroperú ruptured.

The spill affected 400m2 of land, and flowed into the Cashacaño river, which then flows into the river Morona.

Livelihoods and forests at increased risk if land rights are ignored, says new report

Indigenous Peoples and local communities protect half the world's land, but formally own just 10 percent, according to a report released today by a global alliance of NGOs.

London, March 2nd 2016: The Global Call to Action on Indigenous and Community Land Rights, backed by more than 300 organizations all over the world, launches today with the publication of a new report.

Recognizing and expanding the territories of original peoples in Colombia is critical for the peace process

Press Note for the Global call to action on Indigenous and Community Land Rights

In Colombia, over 30% of the national territory has been officially titled to Indigenous Peoples, with some 6 million hectares of collective lands recognized for Afro-Descendant Communities. Nonetheless, in practice these territories are not recognized in the State’s actions, with mining, oil and gas, logging and other concessions issued unilaterally without upholding Indigenous or Afro-Descendant Peoples’ right to free, prior and informed consent.

Pushing for peace in Colombia: Indigenous and Afro-Descendant Peoples join forces to uphold their rights, address mining-related conflict

This report synthesizes the outcomes of Year 1 (2014-2015) of a two year inter-ethnic project between the Embera Chamí People of the Resguardo Indígena Cañamomo Lomaprieta (Riosucio, Supía – Caldas) and Afro-Descendant Communities of the Palenke Alto Cauca – Proceso de Comunidades Negras (northern Cauca) aimed at organizational strengthening and territorial defense around extractives and ethnic rights, with technical support by the Forest Peoples Programme. The project is funded by the Embassy of Norway in Colombia, and the Kingdom of the Netherlands.