Recursos

Developing the global post-2020 framework to protect biodiversity

This technical submission into the CBD process for elaborating a post-2020 global biodiversity framework provides views from the International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity, the International Women’s Biodiversity Network, Forest Peoples Programme, and several indigenous peoples' organisations and networks.

International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity (IIFB) Statement to the Press, Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea

Press release from the press conference held by IIFB at the 12th meeting of the Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity.The press release addresses an impasse that has emerged within the negotiations concerning the use of the terminology "Indigenous Peoples and local communities" to replace the current phrase "indigenous and local communities".IIFB Press Statement

FPP E-Newsletter December 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

What are the prospects for securing the land rights of indigenous peoples, local communities, and women in the foreseeable future?

Significantly, the report of the United Nations Secretary-General’s High Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda, under Goal 1 to “End Poverty”, sets a target to “Increase by x% the share of women and men, communities, and businesses with secure rights to land, property, and other assets”.

FPP E-Newsletter July 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Mutual recognition, mutual respect and mutual benefit are among the desirable attributes of all human relationships. Indigenous peoples and other forest peoples also expect these qualities in their relationships with others – be they governments, private corporations, NGOs or other indigenous peoples’ organisations and communities. This issue of Forest Peoples Programme’s E-Newsletter reports on the state of various relationships between forest peoples and different institutions – as these are forged, tested or broken –in the course of assertions for upholding basic human rights, social justice and solidarity.

Bulletin d'information FPP Juillet 2013 (PDF Version)

Chers amis,

La reconnaissance mutuelle, le respect mutuel et les avantages réciproques figurent parmi les attributs souhaitables de toute relation humaine. Les peuples autochtones et les autres peuples des forêts s’attendent eux aussi à trouver ces qualités dans leurs relations avec des tiers, qu’il s’agisse de gouvernements, d’entreprises privées, d’ONG ou d’autres organisations et communautés de peuples autochtones. Cette édition du bulletin d’information du Forest Peoples Programme rend compte du statut de diverses relations entre les peuples des forêts et différentes institutions, au fur et à mesure de leur établissement, mise à l’épreuve ou rupture, suite à des revendications en faveur du respect des droits humains fondamentaux, de la justice sociale et de la solidarité.

Video: Workshop on customary sustainable use at Conference of the World Indigenous Network

The inaugural Conference of the World Indigenous Network (WIN) took place in Darwin, Australia from 26 to 31 May 2013. The WIN conference was designed to build a strong foundation for an innovative and enduring network of land and sea managers, with a programme aimed at coming together, connecting and sharing stories and experiences of indigenous peoples and local communities who have an active role in managing natural environments. Read more about the WIN here: http://www.worldindigenousnetwork.net/ 

Vidéo : atelier sur l’utilisation coutumière durable lors de la Conférence du Réseau mondial autochtone

La Conférence inaugurale du Réseau mondial autochtone (WIN) s’est tenue à Darwin, en Australie, du 26 au 31 mai 2013. La conférence avait pour objectif de jeter des bases solides pour bâtir un réseau de gestionnaires des terres et des mers novateur et durable, avec un programme axé sur les peuples autochtones et les communautés locales jouant un rôle actif dans la gestion des environnements naturels qui se rassemblent, tissent des liens et échangent des récits et des expériences. Pour en savoir plus concernant le WIN : http://www.worldindigenousnetwork.net/ 

Parties to the Biodiversity Convention not ready to accept ‘indigenous peoples’

A disappointing outcome for indigenous peoples at the 11th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP11) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in Hyderabad, India, 8-19 October 2012: Parties failed to adopt a decision to update the CBD’s terminology ‘indigenous and local communities’ to ‘indigenous peoples and local communities’, due to the resistance of a few Parties.

Les Parties à la Convention sur la diversité biologique ne sont pas prêtes à accepter les « peuples autochtones »

Un résultat décevant pour les peuples autochtones lors de la 11ème réunion de la Conférence des Parties (CdP 11) à la Convention sur la diversité biologique (CDB) à Hyderabad, en Inde, du 8 au 19 octobre 2012 : à cause de la résistance de quelques Parties, les Parties n’ont pas adopté de décision visant à modifier la terminologie de la CDB, pour adopter l’expression « peuples autochtones et communautés locales » au lieu de l’expression « communautés autochtones et locales ».  

FPP E-Newsletter December 2012 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

The importance of ensuring respect for the rights of forest peoples’ to control their forests, lands and livelihoods, becomes ever clearer and yet more contested. As the articles in this edition of our newsletter starkly reveal, land and resource grabs are not just being imposed by commercial developers but are being actively promoted by governments, whose principle responsibility should be to protect the rights of citizens. Yet these same impositions are also being resisted, sometimes at great personal cost, by local communities and indigenous peoples.

New publication: Indigenous Peoples in Decisions of the Convention on Biological Diversity (Working Draft)

Many decisions of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) contain language on indigenous peoples and local communities*, for instance on their full and effective participation, impacts on their lands and livelihoods, the value and contribution of their traditional knowledge and customary sustainable use, and the need for support in capacity building.

Sustainable Development Update: Building resilience through customary sustainable use of biodiversity

"Since almost a decade back, the Resilience and Development Programme (SwedBio) and partners such as Forest Peoples ProgrammeTebtebba Foundation and the International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity (IIFB) have been working for strengthening governance in indigenous territories based on customary sustainable use. The work by SwedBio and partners was initiated by supporting good cases, including presenting them and describing the key factors for success behind. These pilot cases, covering a broad range of social ecological systems, have successively formed a base for building better international policies that adopt customary sustainable use (CSU) as a means for strengthened resilience of biological diversity and contribution to human wellbeing among indigenous peoples and local communities."